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Martin Malik
Bunker

My name is Martin and this is my story. I travel because it is fun and a great way to continue self-education which enriches the worldview and opens my eyes to unnoticeable things, both in the distant countries and the closest ones. Let's get to know other cultures but let's also respect and defend our own.

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The Politics of Truth

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Trips to Asia

Spy – book

TECHNOLOGICAL PRISON WITH GLASS WALLS

My account has been blocked many times for publishing truth and conservative views.

Facebook is a leftist fortress, that truth defines as "hate speech", and common sense as "discrimination." It even happened that Facebook removed the post of pope emeritus Benedict XVI, because it was too conservative - but professionally speaking, it didn't meet the Facebook's "community standards".

In addition, Facebook regularly removes "likes" from right-wing websites and brings them down in search results. Facebook in theory "allows" to promote articles criticizing homosexual propaganda and anti-immigrant policies , but at the same time it does not promote them, because the number of visits in such posts is frozen.

The best known intelligence agencies in the world are: CIA, FBI, MI5, MOSSAD, KGB ..... Google and Facebook. By creating a Facebook account, you set up your own police file!

Think well before you give information about yourself on this important wing of the CIA. We live in times when it is not necessary to brutally interrogate "the enemies of the revolution", if there is a device thanks to which people willingly say what they have done, and even what they will do. Facebook knows who you are connected to; and if you are really naive, it also knows your family and your car registration number. To the secret services, Facebook is a dream come true.

Facebook is a mine that extracts information about you instead of coal, and makes money on your privacy. Really, there is no privacy anymore, and technology becomes more dangerous. As confirmed by Facebook's founder silence, I think that even if you delete your FB account, the info about you stays with them forever.

To those who doubt in "freedom of speech", I advise to learn how to fake your IP address. The first rule is that IP address does not travel with the user, although there are other ways. If someone is an "intolerant racist", and wants to write on FB that: English people are white and only white, that he doesn't want to transform Big Ben into a minaret, and that anus was designed only for toilet purposes, then it is better to post such comments outside of your address, because otherwise, as I have read: "the brave men in police uniforms have no problem in finding a delinquent who promotes an extremist material". This is not Communism by the way , but "progressive democracy".

In addition, Facebook is designed to be addictive. Its template quickly catches the eye, it lets people to complain about social and political matters, and those who feel lonely have their own communities on FB, so they don't feel that lonely anymore. Users are rewarded and punished, that's why they try to present themselves the best the can in the eyes of their communities. They unconsciously open the door to police, secret services, and foreign consulates issuing visas . FB and other social networking sites promote false, improved image of their own reality, for which they want to be admired and rewarded.

Dreams vs Reality- on social platforms.

Do not try to promote an improved image of yourselves on the internet, because you are chasing an unreal dream, which could become a terrible mental blow during the first brutal contact with reality.

Instead, I advise you to learn manual jobs which develop thinking and independence - (carpentry, construction, plumbing, herbology), so we don't end up with a generation of idiots, whose whole world ends with stupid selfies and Facebook likes.

Twitter is another Marxist platform led by Marxist trash; and that's why my Twitter account has been already suspended. Generally on Twitter, church and white people can be offended at will, but on the other hand criticism of homosexual movements and anti-liberal, non-globalist views lead to account suspension. I also noticed that especially quotes from the Bible, to Twitter are like salt in the eye.

When it comes to women, I advise them to learn how to bake cakes for their husbands, instead of flexing their buds on Instagram. Social media is also designed to outcast people from the real society, because people whose attention is constantly hijacked by tablets, smartphones and computers, do not have time to interact with real people.

“People will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think.”

— Aldous Huxley

Throw away your smartphone, and use cheap trashy phones without internet access, and use temporary SIM cards with them. After a week or two, burn them and use another disposable trashy phone. You will be safer and you will keep more privacy from the constantly stalking You eyes of the Big Brother. If several million people did it, smartphones would be free, on a condition of long contracts and internet connection. Stop wasting your life on pressing buttons on your smartphone that you don't even fully understand, and which have already taken over your freedom. Instead, talk to a living human being, have connection with the natural beauty, and your phone can be as primitive as possible. I even think that not using a smartphone these days is an act of rebellion against Big Brother, who wants to control us more and more through visually attractive but to most of us incomprehensible, more advanced applications.

In my point of view phone addiction is a dangerous disease of civilization

"Freedom of speech" on social media is not free, privacy is like golden dust, and officially it is neither Communism nor censorship, but "progressive democracy" based on total invigilation - through creating a pleasant and technically advanced concentration camp with glass walls!

"Believe nothing you hear, and only half the you see."

- Edgar Allan Poe

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A few words from the author

Whilst travelling from the Christian remains of Constantinople and the ancient sands of Persia, through the Himalayas, the Great Wall of China and the dense jungles of Borneo, I realized that the world must have its order. Therefore despite my beautiful adventures and experiences I always remembered which culture I myself belonged to, and I also appreciated the beauty and values of our beautiful - White Christian civilization.

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Travel reports

Expedition to Sri Lanka 2008

By: Martin Malik
All travel reports are translated electronically although minor improvements are sometimes made.

Sri Lanka 2008 – travel journal

My trip: Katunayake-Colombo-Kelaniya-Dehiwala-Mt Lavinia-Kandy-Peradeniya-Nuwara Eliya-Horton Plains National Park and World Ends-Bandarawela-Kubalwela-Ella-Badulla-Dunhinda-Hatton-Delhouse Waterfall Pada) -Maskeliya-Dambulla-Sigiriya-Inamaluwa-Polonnaruwa-Anuradhapura-Trincomalee-Uppuveli-Nilaveli-Puttovil-Arugam-Matara-Mirissa-Televijaya-Unawatuna-Galle-Hikkaduwa-Bentota-Aluthgama-Kosgoda-Negombo-Katunayake.

Colombo and around

Road to Colombo

After nearly fifteen hours of flight with a two-hour transfer in Kuwait, I reached Katunayake Airport-30km from Colombo. Just after leaving the plane, the guy in the toilet threw a piece of paper and reached out for a few rupees. I thought this would be the place where I start my new Sri Lankan adventure. Then I got a free stamp entitling me to a 30-day stay in this country and went outside. The first thing that struck me was a beautiful exotic and tropical warm climate. There were high coconut palms and banana trees around and it was not as hot as it was in Dubai a few months earlier. This was a pleasant warmth. Right after leaving the airport I was met by people offering expensive hotels and expensive taxis to Colombo, but as usual I chose a cheap option. I got to the free shuttle bus to get to Katunayake town about 10 minutes from where I had to take another bus to Colombo. The views were a little disturbing to me because apart from the palm trees the country looked like it was prepared for war. There were a lot of armed troops and their barracks covered with sheet metal and sandbags on all sides. Some of the streets were blocked and cars were stopped for inspection. Even at the children’s playground there was a guard tower with an armed soldier in the middle, and the army was walking along the square. After a few minutes I reached the village of Katunayake, and at that moment I remembered an earlier trip to the Subcontinent. At the train station or rather at a cluster of old lumber called buses when they saw a white man they did not know how much to think up prices for a ride to Colombo. They wanted 200 rupees but learned that the ticket cost only 80. When I agreed the price they wanted 80 rupees for me and 80 for my backpack but I did not pay. I have been in many developing countries but I never knew people who would be so hungry for money. The road to Colombo was pleasant.On the way I saw many coconut palms and coconuts selling 20 rupees of art, many banana trees, river and poor people – often walking barefoot. Although Sri Lanka is a Buddhist country, on the way I also saw many Hindu temples and Catholic churches. Only 30km was over for an hour as the Sri Lankan transport was so bad and the bus stopped every time someone wanted to get in. Sometimes the bus only slowed down and people jumped in. I remember that the key ticket was the ticket salesman who was standing in front of the door and shouting people in, yelling “Colombo.” Finally after more than an hour’s drive I got to Colombo where I paid my 80 rupees and got off at Fort. I was happy because it was just this “beautiful different” world I am looking for in my expeditions.

Colombo

Fort

When I left the bus I took my backpack and walked towards the hostel. I walked through the busy station, nearby bazaar and many coconut traders – 100 ways to use coconut On the way I passed a few beggars and I sat down for a moment at the juice seller. As usual, he wanted to count double but I figured out what the real prices are. I tried the fruit juice that I drank for the first time in my life. Translating from English it was a wooden apple and the fruit of Jack. I immediately understood why the apple was wooden. The shell was so hard that it had to be splashed with a hammer and in the middle there was a delicate fruit that I did not like because it was too sour. The juice was very good. As for Jack’s fruit, it was a large, green and spiked tuber that I had seen earlier growing on tree trunks. In the middle of it was to throw away but the yellow parts in the pits area were good. The juice itself was delicious too. After a moment I went to the hostel and through the colonial building belonging to the police today, a line of rickshaw drivers and of course many military barricades I got to the YMCA, the cheapest hotel in Colombo. There for 440 rupees I had a room for myself which was very poor. I had a sprawling wooden bunk, a sink and luckily a windmill under the ceiling, which turned out to be salutary in this climate. The bathroom was out and although everything worked well, it was in a terrible condition. The water was cold and cold and the walls devoured the mushroom. The kible itself was nothing. But before I started to explore, I had to sleep a few hours after a long flight and the city was only about four in the afternoon. On the way out, I had an interesting meeting with the police chief who was asking me where I was from, why I came to Sri Lanka and how much I was going to stay. He was nice but the conversation looked a bit like an audition. From what I learned, the police come to the hostel regularly and ask the visitors for the purpose of their visit and searches the luggage. However, foreign guests are treated very gently. It is clear that this country is set up in combat readiness. Even here in the Fort area there were many bombings organized by the Tamil Tigers.Having missed some beggars sleeping on the street under the hostel and drinking coconut from a garbage-out shop I went to explore the Fort area. This district of the name may suggest that it is a beautiful, magnificent fort from several centuries as it is in India. But there is no such colombo in the fort, and the district itself carries only such a proud name. Fort in Colombo is a small area surrounded by the ocean where there are a couple of modern World Trade Center buildings and several colonial homes such as Cargills, which is now converted into a shop.

There is also the great Intercontinental Hotel and as always the clock tower in Sri Lanka, which is a visible memorial to the British colonialism. Lack of traffic allows for quite a quick transition of the entire area but unfortunately I could not get wherever I wanted because most of this area was protected by the military. I had to walk only the designated streets because there were barricades and military posts surrounded by sandbags. I was admitted to some areas after checking the documents and answering a few questions but there was nothing interesting. Many buildings have not been rebuilt after the last bomb explosions, and those that were in their own hands were in terrible shape. I wanted to get to the ocean this evening, but unfortunately the military forbid me, because on both sides it was an area of ​​increased combat readiness.From what I’ve seen, the army and the police have always been very nice and trouble for me. They stopped and searched only local people with an emphasis on Tamil because it was the violence of the national minority. That evening, in addition to the overall impression of the Fort, I was able to see the Buddhist temple of Sambothi Chaitiya with her large white dagoba. At the entrance stood a large, golden statue of the sitting and meditating Buddha and next to it was a white dagoba with small buddha sculptures in the windows. The area was also pretty vegetation and the whole facility was new to me in this country, although many similar places I have seen in other parts of Asia. When it started to dim I went back to my beautiful hostel where on the way I made some photos of the poor and then talked to a funny manager. I noticed that Sri Lankan also has a habit of shaking his head, which means “yes”, “no” or “I do not know what you mean” and it is a gesture that is very misleading. It was the same in India and Nepal, but since then I’ve had the time to clean up. Late at night I went for a walk near Fort Railway Station. On the way I passed several beggars and homeless dogs, a few barbed wire and a barricade of roads to get some nice smiles from the army armed to the teeth to get close to the station. Until late night the place was full of life. You can eat roti, dal and paratha in one of the many obituary pubs where the waiter throws food with dirty paws on the table. I was tempted because I was hungry and as the only one I ate with a fork because all the rest of the rice curry and buryani were eating with their hands. Coconuts, sweets and fruits were also nearby, where the bananas hung on the branches and the apples were tied behind the laces to the ceiling. Before the station itself, unfortunately, many beggars slept in tragic conditions. Then the same way I returned to the YMCA hostel where I took a shower in a tragic bathroom and fell asleep on my bunk after turning on the windmill. The next day I got up at six in the morning to get to see everything. I left the hotel and first had a drink from the coconut and after passing the army, the beggars and the banana salesmen headed for Fort Station. On the way I noticed the great propaganda posters of the Sri Lankan President Rajapakse.In every photo he gave his hand to the presidents of other countries, though his photos are full of Sri Lankan and always look whiter than the rest of the Lankans. The second important thing I noticed was the name Ceylon in many parts of the city. Although the official name of the country was changed from Ceylon to Sri Lanka in 1972, the old name is still alive. For example, some bars are called Ceylon, Ceylonta is tea, and Ceylon Tea is always written on all others. One of the largest banks in Sri Lanka is the Bank of Ceylon. I also saw the Ceylon insurance company and the colonial hotel. That day my first goal was to see the famous Pettah district.

Pettah

Fort Pettah is one of the oldest districts in Colombo and the most ethnically diverse in Sri Lanka. Pettah is a great bazaar where you can buy everything from coconuts of course, to vegetables and fruits and all the rest. If the crowd and resistance to the encirclement will allow you to reach here many interesting religious buildings, which for me were notable and have an interesting mood. How easy it is to think Pettah is also the home of many poor people and merchants who look like mischief but without doubt this is a very interesting place. My walk with Pettah started with Budhi Raje Mawate Buddhist Temple. It was a small but very interesting temple. Inside was a tree and many chapels with Buddha and praying people. There were also many interesting paintings on the walls depicting the Buddha and the mood of the temple itself made a nice impression. Then I started walking down the main street full of mud and loud buses. People have pulled great fruit carts that were a lot heavier than they and they often did it on barefoot. Among the noise, dirt and chapel with Buddha were sold fruits and vegetables and I sat down near one coconut seller and watched the show in Pettah. I went to temples that were in the area but nobody could manage me or speak English and the streets were badly labeled. Finally, I hired a rickshaw drivers who took me to all the places I wanted to see, and by the way, it gave me a broader picture of Pettah. First I visited the Wolvendaal church of 1749, which is the most important Dutch building in Sri Lanka. Unfortunately, it requires renovation like the vast majority of buildings in this country but its historic value is important.Besides, I was not able to see it from the inside because it was closed and I tried twice that day. The small church of St. Anna is worth mentioning. He is all white and in very good condition and as I was told he was built by the British but I do not know in which year and no one was able to answer this question.

Then the rider drove me to two mosquitos I wanted to see here. The first was the Great Mosque, which is the most important mosque center in Colombo. Personally, I think that for such an important moslem place it should be renovated because it is in a terrible condition. There is a large, in the middle there are several shallow pools as always and there is also a large hall for prayers but I expected more. Especially after seeing the magnificent, great mosques in Delhi and Lahore this definitely did not impress. Interesting in this place was the contact with people, for example my visit to a simple fried roti (pancake with different stuffing sharp or sweet) and people taking a shower in the street. It is clear that in Sri Lanka people are more relaxed in certain matters. Among the many mosques built in Pettah, a small but very interesting mosquito-lined mosque, painted by Jami-Ul Alfar in 1909, deserves special attention. This time I spent most of the time, first out from the outside I looked at his white red walls and then spent time with the Muslims inside. From the inside it was also necessary to renovate, but this was not important. I had a good time with people, the mosquito itself was very interesting and the rest of the people washed my face in the pool. On the way I drank coconut drinks, spent the time with the poor people who were here a lot and gave them a couple of rupees. Then came the ever colorful and colorful Hindu temples (kovils), whose richness of ingenuity and color of sculpture I had the opportunity to admire while traveling in southern India. (I’m referring here primarily to the temple complex of Sri Meenakshi in Madurai). Being in Pettah I visited them many but the three most famous temples in Sea Street deserve the attention. This is New Kathiresan Kovil and Old Kathiresan Kovil devoted to the god of war Skanda. In the same street there is another shrine dedicated to Geneshy-god with elephant head, son Shiva. Just as before in southern India, as well as here in Sri Lanka, these temples consisted of tall, upwardly covered roofs with Hindu gods and sacred cows. To me, the most interesting was Ganesha-with the face of an elephant and Hanuman-with the face of a monkey. When I went to one of the temples, Indian music played in such a great way that it raised the pressure in the temple that this adventure took on a sharper image for me. On the way I visited other Hindu temples. This was an example of the Murgan Temple where before the entrance were sculptures showing the fight of people with lions. I also had the opportunity to enter one of the settlements where ordinary people lived.

Of course it was poor. The gate was quite impressive because it was in the style of the temple, but in the middle were poor-looking houses, food was carved with wooden carts and women bathed their children in a bowl of water under palm trees. At the end of the day, I wanted to visit the Dutch museum, but the Wolvendaal church was closed. Well, at least I saw a building from the outside, which had a great historical value. It was built in 1780 and has historically served as the Dutch city hall, orphanage, private home, police station, post office and hospital. Today, like most of the buildings, it definitely requires renovation. After another interesting conversation with the local people and after another coconut I got to the rickshaw and soon my trip was over. My ranger blew up near Fort Station where eating paratha and roti in a dirty pub planned further exploration of Colombo. Pettah was very interesting as it captures the realism of this country and I recommend it to anyone who is in Colombo. This is a very good experience.

Galle Face Green and Galle Road

To get to Galle Face Green I could go from the Fort area along the ocean however military blockade thwarted it. So I had to take the city train one stop and get off at the slave island station. As I could guess the trains and stations were far from luxurious but as the standards of the developing country were pretty good. (I think at this point about Varanasi in India, which may be a shock even for an experienced traveler).From there, after about 10 minutes, I reached the place on the way past the blockades and military posts surrounded by sandbags. I also passed a large and located in a beautiful garden full of palm trees, Hotel Samudra. I went to his place because the garden was really nice. Palms and waterfall were a quiet part of town compared to the busy Pettah. Across the street and just before my destination was the famous Sri Lankan Galle Face Hotel and before him stood a row of rickshaws and a fruit stand. I asked the racers for a photo on the background of their vehicles and palms and then with wrapped mango I went to Galle Face Green. The place is a very quiet walking area where on one side there is a well-kept lawn and several palm trees and another Indian ocean. This is a very popular place in Colombo among walking families, picnics, kite amateurs, fruit sellers and young couples who come here to cuddle. The only pity is that the police are bothering them by identifying anyone they encounter, but that is the country. It was a pleasure to spend time talking with people, walking the pedestrian street and pier and eating mango. Next to it was a well-known street called Galle Road called some of Colombo’s spine. I was only there for a while because I was not interested in a noisy street filled with shops where I could barely breathe and the buildings were very uninteresting. There are a couple of embassies and the official residence of the Prime Minister of Sri Lanka but I donated to myself. Galle Face Green and ocean view were definitely worth more than another busy, polluted street.

Slave Island

With Galle Face Green I went back to the Slave Island Station again, passing the hotel Galle Face and Samudra. But I did not come because once again the police blocked the road because somebody important from the government and reportedly threatened by the Tamil Tigers is the largest. The police treated me very gently, asking me to wait five minutes. One policeman asked me all the standard questions, or where I am, whether I first came to Sri Lanka and how much, but also whether I have a wife and children and whether to give him some money from his country because he collects. Several times I have met this kind of “collectors”. Rupees do not like it, they want mostly euros and pounds and then dollars and the rest. One of the policemen showed me five Slovak crowns and asked how many dollars it was. He was happy when I told him that about 2.5. Then he asked me to take him to Poland or to England or anywhere in Europe and to get him a white woman because the Lankijki does not like him. After unlocking the road I said goodbye and was pleased because it was another fruitful experience of my trip.By the way, I would have to go crazy to fulfill his wish. On the way to the slave island station I passed many palm trees, a turquoise river and the Buddhist temple of Sri Nigayabode with the monument of the great golden Buddha. Here I rested in the shade and wiping sweat from my brow, I drank another coconut for only 20 rupees. I was also the attraction of the day wherever I went because I had torn trousers on the front of both legs and people until they stood and pointed me. They were surprised that a white rich man like me (in their opinion) could not afford to wear trousers. Shortly after, I went on and around one of the many colonial buildings I reached the church of St. Rosary and then to the nearby, large Hindu temple of Sri Shiva Subramania Swami Kovil, located on Kew Road. Also here was a rising roof, tapering up with elaborate figures of saints of the Hindu religion. This was much higher than the temples in Pettah and also here at the main gate were sculptures of men fighting or rather controlling the lions. As I walked on the same street I came across the mosque of Akbar and although the mosk was definitely not the most impressive I had another informative meeting here. One Muslim was nice enough to offer me photos and advertise as a good photographer. It turned out that I met another “collector” of foreign currency, who asked me if I have a euro because it is his favorite.

It is true that no one collects foreign currency here. If I gave him a gift of 1 or 2 euro then such a “collector” would attract tourists from Europe and asked him to exchange for the rupiah because they are so euros need. Euro is currently around 130 rupees, many of which are not seen here quite often. I have had so many cases here, and naive tourists are picking up. My next destination was Lake Beira and two temples of Sema Malakaya located on the islands near each other. These temples were quite new and nicely located, and what I liked most about it was the statues of the Buddha around and the rest of the sculptures ie the larger Buddha and the relatively small, white dagoba. The temple was nice and interesting but it was more interesting to contact the caretaker. He was delectable and he took pictures of me whenever I wanted and even said that he knows where he will be the best because he is a photographer. He said he got a Nikon camera from one tourist and earned it, but lost it and now works in the temple. Of course, I did not believe in one word because I was getting used to Sri Lankans and I was waiting for him to offer me a temple subsidy. When he took a few photos of me and told me about his life story, he let me sit in his chair and then went to the topic I was waiting for. He said he wanted to donate to the temple (not for him of course) and foreign guests usually give 2,000 rupees. He pulled in a dirty, broken basket and his gaze was so hungry for money and so he lied, looking me straight in the eye that the meeting was more and more interesting. The truthful conclusion is however that the entrance to all the temples is free and there is no obligation to pay so he just wanted to launder a lot of money and look for a naive one. I gave him 20 Rupees for coconut, thanked for the photos and left Sema Malakaya Temple. I barely left this place, but another scoundrel caught me. This was elegantly dressed and after asking standard questions he pulled out several forms with pictures of the children and asked for a subsidy for the school-that is, to himself. In a few paragraphs he wrote the same pen and the same character of the letter even up to 5000 rupees. He said that so many tourists from Europe, but I told him to look for naive elsewhere. Then he turned quickly on his heels and disappeared. When I was alone I stopped for a while and watched the trees that are in Sri Lanka are beautiful. In addition to many interesting species of palm trees are trees with very thick trunks but also braided with branches that grow into the ground creating a beautiful view and make it look like a tree was even bigger than it is in reality.

All of them lined up. I walked along the shore of Lake Beira and after crossing the bridge I reached another island, which is a quiet and pleasant meeting place of the Latvian families but now also tourists from Poland. As usual in Sri Lanka, there are many couples to celebrate in the long grass, and fortunately there are no police. After some time I left Lake Beira and went to the nearby Buddhist temple Gangaramaya. This temple was large and I loved it. In the main part there were many statues of Buddha and other figures painted in very colorful colors, and in addition there were paintings on the walls with the same content. At the exit stood a large elephant eating leaves, which was definitely an ornament and next was a shallow pool with koi carp. In the same area there was also a library, a museum and a shop with paintings and sculptures. In the center of the square grew a large tree around which the stairs to the museum were built, and its thick boughs and lilies hung almost to the ground giving even better effect and mood to this place.There was a large, white dagoba on the raised platform, and around it were posters of temples, thanks to which my memories woke me up. I remembered my trip to Burma because the posters depicted the Shwedagon Pagoda temples of Rangoon and Kyaitkiyo, or Temple on the golden rock. As usual, it was in Sri Lanka and here I had my guide who was taking pictures of me and also begging for a couple of rupees though I had only a big banknote and I did not have the money to give him 10 or 20 rupees for a favor that should be basically free. At the exit of one of the outer walls there were many interesting sculptures depicting not only Buddha but also a warrior and slim women with narrow waists and big breasts. The whole temple was the best I have ever seen in Sri Lanka. Both exteriors and interior were beautifully finished. Additional advantages were calm and elephant.

Cinnamon gardens

On the same day I went to the richest, most expensive and purest district of Colombo or Cinnamon Gardens. This name comes from the plantation of cinnamon trees, which grew in this area about 100 years ago. Today there are many embassies, galleries, rich and influential residences and several sports facilities.Actually, it is the name of the street where beautiful trees grow with lions and boughs to the ground although in this chapter I will place a few objects in the vicinity. I first went to the Viharamahadevi park, which was once called Victoria Park, but changed its name immediately after regaining independence (then by Ceylon).

This park was quite large and I was happy walking here among the palm trees and massive trees with lions but as I could foresee, I was soon attracted by the intrusive gardener, who necessarily wanted to earn.Everywhere he wanted to show me, show me everything and of course everything for free. At first I ignored him but he was pushy and when he asked what I was doing in England I said I was a gardener to make him nice but it made him even more excited to act. First, I went to the city office called a white house and I made some pictures at the statue of the great golden Buddha. On the way back, however, my gardener was waiting for me. First of all, he wanted to know my name, where I am from, how many children I have and whether I am married and how much I earn. It did not surprise me at all when he said that he also collects money and preferably if it were euros or pounds because he likes most of all. He showed me around the park and showed me some interesting plants. In addition to the palm trees, the mango and banana trees showed me a lemon tree, then broke the leaf and wanted me to try it. I actually felt the taste of lemon but it was no news to me as I was already in the lemon field in Bangladesh. He also showed me some beautiful flowers and he asked me every time how much a flower would cost in London. He could not be surprised when I said that for him such a common helicopter cost in England about 3 pounds, or even about 500 rupees. Interesting was the cinnamon tree, especially since the gardener scraped off a piece of bark and gave me a try. When I said that I knew most of the plants in the park, the gardener led me to a tree on which the branches were hung with huge bats and then with their colleague hit the tree stalk to start flying. Everything for me to see how big they really are and I probably would then give them from 10 euros. After a short conversation they wanted me to stretch for 20 euros and said that this is their favorite currency and they are gathering. But when I wanted to be nice and gave them 50 rupees they were offended and said that the rupees did not want only the currency of my country or euros and pounds. In addition, I am a gardener so I should help him. I said no problem, I thanked and left.

As far as I know, Sri Lanka has no thievery, but everyone is a potential harlot and a crook. I was also surprised when the lurid caretaker from the Gangaramaya temple, a kilometer away, came to the park, because I had not had a few before, and I was supposed to give him 20 rupees. I thought that Sri Lanka was really a country of very poor people, very hungry for money. They do not show on postcards! After Victoria Park (the old name is easier for me) I went down the Cinnamon Gardens and stopped in front of the National Museum. It was a large, white building built in colonial times, set on a large green field and what does not always happen in Colombo was in very good condition. Unfortunately, before I got inside I had to have a talk about money. As in most Asian countries in Sri Lanka, the “white man price” is approved by the government. The Lankans pay only 20 rupees for the entrance of the museum while the tourists are 500. I paid for it and went inside. Inside I liked it very much because it was my first contact with the ancient cities to which I was following. On the ground floor there was an exhibition of primitive people and sculptures made in the rocks, coming from different periods in the history of the island. There were, among other things, Buddha sculptures and religious reliefs from the early capitals of this ancient country, from Polonnaruwa and Anuradhapura. On the first floor there were tools from the space of history, clothes, dishes and to my surprise the doll from a country that is no longer-Czechoslovakia. There was an exhibition of wicker bags on rice several hundred years ago and various types of kitchen utensils made of coconut.The skeleton of the blue fin with hanging bells on the ceiling was also interesting. The whole area of ​​the museum loved it but unfortunately it was a bit pricey. Then I went to see the Independence Monument, which was as easy to imagine was built in 1948 to commemorate the return of Independence (then) by Ceylon. The Monument of Independence consisted of a square on which the monument of the then prime minister of Ceylon was laid on the tower and surrounded by lions. The second part is a building that consists of a roof and many carved pillars and below is a well-kept park.

Also here I met a poor man who sold used stamps of Ceylon and Sri Lanka for only 100 rupees. My return to the Fort area was also very successful. As usual there was a police blockade and people were being reviewed. However, when I talked to the police they were so nice that they stopped the bus for me in the middle of the road, then got on and got a few rupees to get to the Fort. Impressions from the bus also have very pleasant. We have to admit that so far in Sri Lanka I have been treated with all the honors. They all turn to me “sir”, they are nice and the police are very helpful and smiling at my sight. The first impressions after arriving in Sri Lanka, ie the blockade with sandbags, the army and a lot of guns can be a cause for concern but there is no reason to worry. It was a very successful day during which many saw it.

Kelaniya

When I saw what I wanted in Colombo I went to the village of Kelaniya, 7km to the east of the Fort. True, it is only 7km but in Sri Lanka it is 7km. I got there by city bus and after about 40 minutes, overcoming the traffic jams of dirty city I got to the place. I hoped it would be worth it. In Kelaniya there is the most important Buddhist center in the vicinity of Colombo and one of the most important in the island. There is a temple of Kelaniya Raja Maha Vihara, which according to the beliefs of Buddha spoke 2000 years ago.Before the temple I was refreshing the coconut and then passing through the line of rickshaw drivers and sellers of lotus flowers, I began to climb the high stairs to soon understand that my drive here was not wasted. (According to legend, under the feet of Prince Sidharty – afterwards the Buddha, Lotus flowers rose every time he took a step). At the entrance of the temple I had to take off my shoes, of course, and then I could go into the temple. There stood the rear wall of the main part of the building, beautifully decorated with reliefs, and to the right was a square covered with sand. In the middle of the square grew a huge tree with branches covered with flags for prayers. Around it was an ornamental wall with stairs leading to the statue of the golden Buddha, and around the wall were people praying and carrying gifts for the Buddha in the form of bananas, coconuts and lotus flowers. (In the middle of each Buddhist temple grows a tree because, according to legend, the Buddha attained nirvana status just meditating under the tree).

Near the people lit candles on specially prepared for this place and others sat with folded hands and prayed to the Buddha. I felt happy in this beautiful place surrounded by palm trees and would happily continue to visit. Well, I could witness such wonderful religious buildings and at the same time a paradise for a traveler of my kind or an ambitious psychologist for whom this place would definitely be a great research center. Moving further, I reached the front of the temple, whose entrance was set on pillars and was curiously decorated with elephant sculptures. In the middle, there were paintings of saints and people associated with Buddhist culture, but at this stage of my knowledge I can not precisely define their meaning. But all were beautiful and certainly worth seeing. There was also a huge white dagoba which I had seen many times in Burma, and next to it stood a statue of a large standing Buddha. I have done many interesting pictures of objects and people who have always been willing to cooperate. Also a sculpture of the emaciated Buddha depicting him during the fast was also interesting. The entire temple was beautiful and despite the bus ride from Colombo I count it obligatory. There is also one sign in Buddhism that I often see in temples and sometimes in homes. This is a sign that at first glance looks like a Nazi swastika only that it is reversed. In Buddhist and Indian traditions, it means happiness and is often placed in homes to attract happiness. On the other hand the Nazi party adopted the swastika as its sign in Salzburg in the 1920s and as we know from history this kind of swastika has not brought happiness. I am referring to this sign in order to learn to distinguish the message of this symbol in different cultures. I will add that one of the first swastikas was painted about 10 thousand. years ago in a paleotolithic cave and this sign is found on the coins and ceramics of ancient China, India and Greece.

After all, I got into another nice bus to come back to Colombo accompanied by young monks. I noticed that monks are so respected in Sri Lanka so much that when even several-year-old boys with shaved heads and dressed in orange traditionally enter the bus, people in the blink of an eye are starting to give up their seats.

Dehiwala

On the same day I took a city train to Dehiwala to visit the zoo. The road was nice because the railroads were very close to the shore, and so that 10km south of the Fort Station, I was watching the ocean, beaches and palm trees. When I left the station I walked about a kilometer, but then I took a bus that took me to the zoo gate. Here I had to get very upset because when my turn came to buy a ticket it turned out that the “white man” price for the entrance was 1000 rupees while the Lansians paid only 50. That is, the Sri Lankan zoo is only half cheaper than it is in London. This is another proof that the Latvian government is losing its tourists to the maximum which is normal here. In Sri Lanka there are two prices – local price and tourist price. I pay where I have to pay for entry, ie in places where I get tickets approved by the government, but for a few days in this country know what cost and I do not get fooled. In the end, after a good talk and then after a big fight, I paid 1000 rupees and everyone around me was tired. I remembered when I unleashed a scare in front of the Lahore zoo in Pakistan and they were so tired that they let me in for free. In Sri Lanka, however, it is different than in Pakistan because here the government and people are so hungry for money that it does not fit in our heads. The standards of the developing country of the Dehiwala Zoo are awe-inspiring and they treat their animals very well, although one European country may boast of it. The first beautiful thing I saw at the entrance was the vegetation, especially the species of palm trees that are not in the streets. On the left side there was an aquarium, flamingos and a seal jumping over the water while the trainer was holding the fish. On the right side there were large cats, then ornamental and predatory birds, and my favorite reptiles. In this herpetarium I saw, among other things, a white lantern, some interesting vipers and gawlals, which I had the opportunity to admire more in the Daka zoo – in Bangladesh.

Unfortunately, his water was very small and he shared it with reddish turtles. Most of the whole herpetary liked the green anaconda, which I saw for the first time live. It was not as great as this species because it was about five meters long and was wide enough for a large dog. Still, it was still an impressive snake, though not as pretty as the one I kept in my bedroom at home. Very important animals here were elephants, which are reproduced here and are of various ages, from several years to several dozens. Many of them are here working on moving trees to build new farms, eating for other animals and for elephants but they are also used for demonstrations. The highlight of each day is the performance of about five in a specially built arena where the elephants walk by holding the trunk of the neighbor’s tail, passing in small steps, standing on the hind legs and foreheads and doing various poses in groups for several animals. The monkeys, especially the orangutan male, stared at me with sadness as he was alone. The zoo was very interesting and beautiful, but unfortunately the humor spoils the insolence of the Latvian government because of over-extraction of tourists. When I left the zoo I went to Dehiwala Village for a coconut and a handful of rice with vegetables and then to the station. Unfortunately I was told that there were no trains so I took the rickshaw and for only 400 rupees I got to the Fort area under the hotel itself. As usual, the police stopped us two times and the mechanic had to resign but when they saw the white man in the back seat they just smiled and let go. I also noticed that the head of the hotel probably liked me because he started joking with me and asked if my family lives in the zoo. Then he said that if I want it I do not have to pay 440 rupees for the room and I can go to the dormitory with 16 beds but for only 150 rupees. I agreed without hesitation because it was something in my style. Besides, I had a beautiful view of the houses ruined by the bombing. It was so moody …

Mt Lavinia

After a few days of exploring Colombo I wanted to finally get in touch with the wonderful, warm Indian ocean. I got on the local train and after half an hour I was there. On the way I had nice views of the ocean and palms and armed troops and barricades. I also had an interesting conversation with one man about living in Sri Lanka. He told me that the average salary is about 15tys rupees although many in other parts of the country earn only 5tys and much of the society has no job at all and lives from what he grows. (As of today 1USD = 108LKR). From here there are so many banana sellers, mango and papaya though many open up small stands where they also make tea and fry eggs. In tourist places, many people make their own souvenirs, mostly from what they have plenty of coconut and shell. He said the pension is only for the police and the army, and the rest is as much as he earns and can not count on the government’s help though it is getting more expensive. He said that for example three years ago the bread cost 15 rupees and now it’s already 40 and everything is getting more expensive although living conditions and payouts are the same. I thanked him for this informative meeting and got off at my station. To get there I went through a luxury hotel and finally saw a beautiful beach overgrown with coconut trees. There was also the World Trade Center in Colombo, which gave me the feeling that I was still close to my base. But I did experience more than just the beach. As soon as I touched the feet of the sand came to me a boy who wanted me to sell shells beads, and when I refused to offer marijuana, which sells here every ranger, the bead seller, though I heard that even the police. He followed me for a long time and did not give me any peace. He said he was poor, that there is no job because he is a fisherman and lately he does not go to the deep water because no one takes him. So it is on the beach and trying to sell to tourists what can only. He also wanted to show me a crocodile and a warrior for 200 rupees but I donated to him. He sat next to me for about half an hour and was tired of the story of his life but left when he understood that he would not get anything.Then at last I plunged into warm waves and sailed. That was exactly what I came here for. The ocean was very warm and raised me on the surface and in the distance there were palm trees. It was beautiful. I also went for a walk on the beach where I saw fishermen who had just returned with their fishing and as usual did not go without pictures and many personal questions about me. I also went to the village where the fishermen lived in their homes destroyed by the tsunami.

Two of them wanted to stretch me as usual, and as usual they were looking for a naive one. One wanted to take me on a boat ride for 5tys rupees and the other pretended to be a pilot because he had a suit. This was the best because he introduced himself as a fighter pilot who visited his fishermen’s military plane and said he parked several palm trees on. After a while he gave me the business card of his insurance company and said that he and his colleague can do everything for me. The second began to speak to me in German because the cruise had so far taken Germans and this language was very well known, but when I said a few sentences my limited German, he again went to English. They were definitely looking naive but could not even lie well. Anyway it was nice because I was a bit amused and besides, I made good pictures of people on the background of the village destroyed before the tsunami. I thought I was in peace, but after a while came the beads traders. They gave me another tragic story and wanted to sell something but they preferred alms. Out of curiosity I went with them to their village and I was really sorry. Around them were demolished concrete buildings and they lived in a tent under palm trees in a few people. They said that when the tsunami struck four years ago and everything was destroyed, the Sri Lankan government promised to build a new house within six years, but after four years they still sleep in a tent. They have no job and no prospects and they ask for any money. They were really poor and desperate, so I gave them a few kilos of rice so they could feed their families for some time. These kinds of stories and events are in Sri Lanka everyday and you have to get used to it. Then I was still swimming in the ocean, which was as usual great and I sat in an elegant, air-conditioned hotel to write postcards. I wanted to eat but the prices were crazy so I went to the town of Mt Lavinia where in a regular pub accompanied by average Lankers I ate fabulously cheap roti with different fillings and I drank Ceylon tea. It was very nice, realistically and cheaply as I like. On the way back to the station the rickshaws wanted to take me where I wanted for a huge money and the gift shoppers came out of my sight. But they did not know my cheap nature and the strong sense of savings. So I got on the train for only 10 rupees and went back to Colombo to Fort Station. Mt Lavinia for most tourists is just a small town with a beautiful beach and luxury hotel but I will always remember this place as the beach of poor people who were victims of the tsunami and above all the tragic place where they were born. Besides, it was lovely.

Road to Kandy

After seeing everything I was interested in in Colombo and its surroundings, I went to one of the main tourist centers, the town of Kandy. At Colombo Fort, I met the great and suspicious courtesy of one man who took me to my car, pointed the seat (as if I could not), helped with luggage, and even flushed dust from the seat. I asked how much she wanted for this overwhelming help but he said nothing. After a while he pulled out a notebook to show me how many foreigners they gave to schools and pictures of poor children and wanted 5000 rupees. I said I would not and politely left. It was a classic example of how it is in Sri Lanka. The road to Kandy passed me nice because on the way I had beautiful views of mountains and palm trees and banana trees. I also visited many stations where the armed troops were always stationed.After two hours and forty minutes I reached my destination.

Mountain Region

Kandy

Kandy is a popular tourist destination on the island and as many believe it is the only one in Colombo city because there is even some traffic. Kandy is worth visiting mainly because of the Temple of Tooth and the pretty lake around which the most beautiful part of the city is concentrated. After getting out of the station I went through a chaotic, dirty bazaar and a busy street where the buses much older than I was hitting the city. I bought a few mango pieces for only 50 rupees to half give away to the poor and went through the center of Kandy where the trade flourished. Then I got to the lake where it was much cleaner and where the mango stalls were and walked around the shop. I spent a few minutes here to enjoy the scenery. While visiting the mango, I saw people feeding fish, beggars pulling their hands to the ground, and in the distance there was a famous temple of the tooth. There were also a lot of strangers who wanted to take my hotel for a double rate and were extremely unhappy so I had to be very unhappy for them to give me a break. In the end I got myself a YMBA hotel but it was the most expensive one ever. The head of the hotel was so disgusting that it cleared me up 690 rupees because it was a tourist price and for the Lankans it was only 460 rupees. Although it was uncomfortable I did not want to worry about less than two pounds and went out to explore the city. First I went along the lake to talk to a few sellers and look around. This lake was constructed in 1807 and houses a few islands.

One of them is a building that once served as the harem of one of the kings and was later used by the British to store weapons. After a while I got to Kandy’s biggest attraction and one of Sri Lanka’s biggest attractions, the Sri Dalada Maligawa (Tooth Temple). This temple is one of the most important places for Buddhists all over the country because of the holy tooth of Buddha. The story of the tooth itself is quite complicated because, as the legend says, it was taken while burning the body of Buddha. Then he was smuggled to Sri Lanka in the Princess’s hair so he could return to India again. In the 16th century the Portuguese burned him in the Indian state of Goa but as it turned out it was only a copy and the real tooth was intact. Personally, I think that the Buddha’s tooth displayed today is also a copy, and true (if any) is hidden and accessible only to the elite of Buddhist monks. Especially in times of civil war it would make sense, but these are only my guesses. Today’s Teal Temple was built at the turn of the 17th and 18th centuries, although after the bombing of the Tamil Tigers in 1998 the part was destroyed and reconstruction was taking place. When I reached the temple gate I was thoroughly searched and then went towards the object. I had a wall of the same kind as the lake, and behind it stood a characteristic cream tower and the walls of the temple with many buildings, a place to light candles and a roofed bell. It was very interesting but I lost my humor after getting to the cash register. Here the entrance cost 500 rupees while for the Lankans it was only 50 rupees. But I gave 100 rupees to the cashier and let me in without a ticket. I left my shoes in the storage room, I was once again thoroughly searched and finally got into the temple. After walking through the main courtyard and taking a few photos, I went to a small museum where a stuffed elephant, a decorated elephant, and many nasty pictures of a dead elephant hung. This place is popular but for me it was the death chamber. Much more interesting and in a good mood was the square where candlesticks and a large bell under the roof used for religious ceremonies.From here, there was also a view of the other temples surrounded by palm trees outside the temple of the tooth. At this point, when I did not finish the tour, I was able to take the last photo with my new Canon camera. I was a little broken because the most important thing that kept my memories broken. In London, they will pay me or give me a new camera, but it was important for me to take pictures now. I walked out of the temple and spent the next few hours in the company of mango dealers, desperate for every 40 rupees for portions. Watching the lake and feeding birds I thought about what to do next because here the cameras were twice as expensive than anywhere else in Europe.

The reason for this is that in developing countries there is a very high tax on electronics imports but anyway I had to remedy this. After a lot of headaches, after a complete loss of humor and seeing a lot of outdated but very expensive models, I paid £ 450 for the Nikon D40, which cost about £ 250 in London. Hardly, I had a camera on which I would unfortunately lose a little but when I sell it on my return and give it back. I forgot Canon, will not come out so bad. Besides, this model was the only one in Kandy that I liked (I think it was enough about photography). It was dark and on the street they were only beggars so after a cold shower I lay down to sleep, hoping that the new camera would lead me to the end of this trip. The next morning I returned to the Temple of the tooth, but I did not want to be robbed at the entrance, so I said I was here yesterday but broke my camera and now I just want to take pictures. The guards searched me again and let me in for free. After a second walk in the courtyard and seeing what I had yesterday, I went to the main part of the temple where there was something like a Buddhist altar with a painting of Buddha and elephant blows in the center. When I asked someone for a photo, the guard warned me that I was offending Buddha with his back. To Buddha should be facing forward or possibly sideways. Inside was a part that was not covered and another part was a separate building in this large temple and had its own nicely finished roof. At the back was a museum, which was also very interesting. On the ground floor were many monuments of Buddha and one of the largest in the main part of the museum, and on the upper floors there were canvases, sculptures and household items from the time of the kandy kings who built this temple. Also a collection of photos showing the destruction after the bombing of 1998, which was organized by the Tamil Tigers, was also interesting. I saw pictures of sculptures and many other objects that today look perfect but only because they were either reconstructed or replaced with new ones. The monk who showed me the museum also showed me a famous Buddha’s tooth (or rather his copy) but it did not look like a human tooth, but rather a dog’s tooth. The monk also let me in on the balcony from which was a beautiful view across Kandy. I saw a part of the temple of the tooth, many other Buddhist and Hindu temples (kovils), a lake and a white statue of the Buddha standing on the top of the highest mountain. From the temple of the tooth I went to the nearby temples – Natha Devale, Pattini Devale and Vishnu Devale. All of them lie near each other, surrounded by a tall wall and, unfortunately, a guard tower. There is a white stupa and holy trees, and in the middle there are Buddha’s paintings and many statues depicting him.

Natha Devale is the oldest since it dates back to the 14th century. I have noticed that in Sri Lanka many Buddhist temples have a chapel with Hindu gods; eg Ganesha (god of elephant) and in Kandy, where most of them are Buddhists, one of the temples was devoted to the Hindu god Vishnu. Vishnu is a Hindu god and a defender of Sri Lanka but my humble opinion is that on this island, the presence of Hindu gods in Buddhist temples is part of the political correctness of the Tamils, which is meant to alleviate the long-standing conflict. The entire temple complex is definitely worth seeing and the fact that Kandy is a small distance between them are not big. An interesting addition in the temples was the presence of elephants, which during the special ceremonies are dressed, painted and are an important part of religious parades. I visited many other temples, including Catholic churches and mosques, but I also deserve my attention Kataragama Devale slightly away from the Temple of the tooth. This is a very colorful painting of a Skanda (god of war) with many pairs of hands and a dressage peacock. After leaving the temples I went to the city center where I was able to go to a meal at a Muslim restaurant. Here I was given rice on a banana leaf with vegetables seasoned in many ways. It was an interesting culinary experience. Then I went back to the lake to spend time with the mango and fanatics, and then started the second part of exploring Kandy. I went to the national museum but sadly “the price of a white man” was 500 rupees again while for the locals it was 50 rupees. My requests did not help, so I went in the pretext of talking to the manager and although I was told where his room was, I walked the whole museum and to the manager I reached the end of course without paying for the ticket. I wanted to pay 50 rupees but they wanted to rob me because they did not earn anything. The museum itself used to be the home of royal concubines and today there are many interesting things from the period before the European. Among them were armor and maps, although a copy of the 1815 document on the transfer of Kandy Province to British administration was also interesting.Then I went to the archaeological museum and I had a look around for about 10 minutes and then I was asked for a ticket I did not have.

As before, I wanted to pay a fair price because I did not want to be robbed. Inside there were sculptures discovered in Kandy but the museum was not as interesting as the national one. On the way from one museum to another I met someone who showed me something very interesting. It was a 5 rupee bank note from 1945 and was issued by the Bank of Ceylon, with a photo of the British monarch. The banknote was for sale for a magic sum of 200,000 rupees but I managed to take a picture for free. On the same day I was in the British garrison cemetery where British soldiers lay. One of the gravestones I photographed was from 1909. The cemetery itself is not in the best condition and the long grass was eaten by the horse. In the evening, the last attraction of this city was the popular dance of Kandy. The hotel’s presentation which made it lighter for another 500 rupees was very interesting. The dance was very spontaneous and the dancers and dancers were dressed up in colorful costumes and had many silver decorations. There were salts, overturned, gymnastic figures, all in the rhythm of loud drums. Finally there was a walk around the burning coals and overall it was fun and I loved it. This presentation was a great opportunity for the doorstep shoppers and that is why I bought a Sri Lankan cricket shirt for only 550 rupees although I wanted 1200. I was able to realize that Sri Lanka especially compared to neighboring India is unfortunately much more expensive. It was the end of my adventure in Kandy, a city that is definitely worth a visit. I especially recommend the Temple of the tooth, although the lake, other temples and traditional dance also make a lot of fun. I wish I had bad luck with the camera, but it is so. Kandy is definitely a good and mandatory experience in traveling around Sri Lanka.

Peradeniya

6km to Kandy in the direction of Colombo is the Peradeniya botanical garden, the oldest in the whole island. I hesitated to avoid this place because I was not particularly interested in the botanica but it was good that I went there because it was another interesting experience on this beautiful island. These gardens occupy 60 hectares and there are many interesting tree species that I have seen for the first time in my life, although I have traveled the world from Iceland across Europe and most of Asia. This was also a special price for tourists and it was another 500 rupees but I was able to convince the cashier that I was a student and bought a ticket for 300 rupees. Right at the entrance was a garden with spices, including cinnamon, nutmeg and many more. Interesting was the alley of very high palm trees planted here in the 50’s and trees without bark with roots up to a few meters around the tree. There were those that consisted of only a tall trunk and no branches and had a small crown set very high. In the garden of Peradeniya there were many bamboo and palm trees of different species. Some had the shape of an umbrella, others had long leaves growing in line parallel to the trunk, and others had trunks so that they looked like a bunch of palm trees twisted together. Each tree was beautiful and interesting in its own way. Also worth mentioning is a fig tree occupying 1600m 2 and looking like an umbrella under which you can hide in the sun. I was also in a place where a large colony of bats were hanging on the trees. It was amazing when they were flying over my head spreading their big wings. I thought I would spend an hour in the botanical park but it took me a few hours because it is a very interesting place where you can walk all day and do not get bored.From Peradeniya I returned to Kanda just as I got here. I took the local bus for 8 rupees although rickshaw drivers wanted 400.

Dear Kandy to Nuwara Eliya

The first half hour drive was not exciting, especially since I had to get out of the always very dirty and chaotic Kandy train station. Still, it was interesting to see mango, candy, pineapple and other delicacies baked into the bus. This time I went with a small private bus so it did not shake and 80km ride we only beat in three hours which Sri Lanka is even a good result. After about half an hour of driving, we started climbing higher and higher. From Kandy to Nuwara Eliya we had to climb about 1400m asl of narrow and winding mountain roads. I watched palm trees, banana trees and mountains and valleys covered with tea bushes. It can be said that throughout the ride on both sides I had tea fields and other peculiarities of the Latvian nature. We often encountered monkeys and jackfruit trees, which are large green bulbs hanging from tree trunks. There were also some tea factories and Buddhist and Hindu temples and bamboo and rubber trees from which Sri Lanka is also famous. The whole road made me happy just because of the tea fields but it was not the first time for me. Previously I was in Darjeeling in India and in Srimangal in Bangladesh. At the same time, I also saw lakes and people riding on horseback. Here it was cooler than anyone because I was at an altitude of 1889 m

Nuwara Eliya

This small mountain town, located at 1889mn.pm, is a very interesting place of the mountainous land and in its expression it seems more English than today’s England. There are many well-groomed golf courses, rose gardens, Victorian park and horse racing track. In addition, the town is surrounded by tea fields and numerous factories. Just outside the city is the highest peak of Sri Lanka, Pidurutalagala (Mt Pedro, 2524m), and is also a good base for Horton Plains National Park and World`s End. As soon as I got off the bus on a nasty train station but surrounded by beautiful mountains and inhaled fresh mountain air I went to seek peace. On the way, of course, many of the connoisseurs who wanted me to make a room for 1000 rupees, but my perseverance and patience made me find a room in a nice cottage for only 500 rupees per night (about 3 pounds).

Although the townhouses say that everything is occupied and they are the only chance to find a room, there was no problem as the guest houses are full and most of them are next to each other on Haddon Hill Road. There was about one and a half hours left until sunset, so I went to the village and went to the Victorian botanical garden. In this beautiful, natural place I spent about an hour walking on the grass and enjoying the view of beautiful trees and flowers. Although it was nice and the whole garden was very well maintained, it was not as exotic as the Peradeniya botanical garden in Kandy. I was lucky because I met a group of young Lukers who always talked to the tourist and to cheer him up. When I asked the best way to get to the Horton Plains National Park and World`s End, they said that the drive there is complicated, long and quite expensive but they are going there tomorrow and can take me for free. I thanked him sincerely and agreed to the next day. By the way, Victoria Park was a nice, green place where you could relax.Already after dark, going through the town and having golf courses on the left I met an increasingly interesting city. I went to the night bazaar, visited some mosques, church, saw the highest peak of Sri Lanka and went to various kinds of shops filled with rice and coconuts to reach the murder where they drank for the dead. Next to it was the restaurant where the conditions were very “traditional” for the country but the food turned out to be very good. The waiter washed the cutlery for me, put it in boiling water and served the rice with vegetables on a plate covered with a disposable foil. The dish was delicious and cost 140 rupees or about 80 pence. When I asked about the toilet I pointed it out and it was also a nice experience. I walked through a sort of shelter where in the darkest damp kitchen they cut the vegetables at one candle. The hedonized chickens lay on a dirty, clay table. I sensed a few meters away, but everyone was pacing in the corridor. After an unforgettable visit to the back, I sat down again in the pub and drank some tea and then took a picture with a waiter who really needed a shower and a shave. Anyhow it was very cheerful and the food was delicious and so far I felt good. When I returned home, I sat in the guest room with my tea and watched television. They again showed the struggle of the north of the island between the government troops and the rebels, and the boss of the house told me some things about the hard life in his country and the constant lack of money.

That evening, for the first time in Sri Lanka, I had hot water but only for about half a minute. The next morning I went to the gate of Victoria Park and waited for my friends. They were late for about 20 minutes but they finally arrived and we were on our way to Horton Plains and World`s End. (Horton Plains and World`s End in the next chapter). When I returned from the national park, I first went on horseback and then strolled through a very nonstop part of it and got to the local bazaar. Here everything was sold, from coconuts and bananas through spices and meat to home-made items and tacky toys. I was most interested in the vegetable market. From a traveler’s point of view, it was an interesting experience for me, but I was glad that I was just an observer and not part of the show. I have eaten here many exotic fruits such as jackfruit, mango, papaya or rambutan. I also bought a whole pack of small bananas for a great price and most gave out to the poor. In all this confusion and loud haggling of sellers for a sum in excess of a pound or two, one man selling bananas asked me to take him to Poland and he would instead be my servant. It was sad but during my travels I was used to it. I used to be in Burma to give my child for adoption because there was no future for him. Leaving the house in Nuwara Eliya, I said goodbye to the well-to-do head of the hotel, who greeted me very formally and addressed me “sir” and gave my son a teddy bear goodbye. Nuwara Eliya was a pleasant mountain station and another interesting experience on the island.

Horton Plains National Park and World`s End

The Horton Plains National Park and World`s End are one of the most visited national parks in Sri Lanka because of its unique location. The park is located on a plateau lying at 2000m asl and is located about 20km south of Nuwara Eliya. This is where you can see the second and third highest turn of the island, and you can also admire the natural and terrain-specific nature of this part of the world.

As I mentioned in the previous chapter, I was taken by a group of young Lukers, and as the transport and road to Sri Lanka were in a terrible state, driving around 20km took us about two hours. Pursuing this beautiful island with a stunning speed of 10 km / h I had the opportunity to see many peculiarities of nature. We were climbing the winding and bumpy road all the time, and sometimes we had to get out of the car as well, otherwise he would not be able to handle it. It was a great opportunity to see rice terraces and tea fields covering entire mountains and valleys. There were also palm trees and banana trees, jackfruit trees that I climbed and monkeys that were part of this landscape. On my way, the Lans were singing and playing drums and then talking about customs in Sri Lanka and Europe. They said that their dream is to go to a European country but that is not possible because they have no money for it. I asked what was the matter of marriage in Sri Lanka and they said that they might meet with a boyfriend or girlfriend as a friend and maybe they will sometimes kiss them but premarital sex does not even come into play. Although they are the partner they are, and so the parents have very often the final sentence. Then they wanted me to sing so I had to agree not to go out to people without a sense of humor. I sang “perfect day” and they played drums and even with my vocal skills did not come out so bad. Soon after, we reached the park but we had to climb and we reached the main gate waiting for a price shock. It was here that the Läkiyan government was trying to get rid of tourists. The Lankans paid 40 rupees and I 2800 or about 15-pound. At first I was very upset because people from the Indian subcontinent in England are many millions and often get benefits and free housing for the poor and I had to pay more. Interestingly, everyone was happy to see that I was paying more and the moment of giving money was an event for them. I said that since the British Empire nothing changed here because the white people are still here for a dozen times more. At that moment, they were not laughing but kept cold blood. At last we crossed this magical gate and walked on the car. My plan was to overcome the 9.5 km loop, which I predicted I would be able to beat in about 3h although some take up to 4h or longer. I also wanted to go with everyone I came with but they were free and could not organize themselves. Fortunately, one of them kept my pace and took pictures along the way.

Of course, everyone was thoroughly searched first, but no one moved me. I only have to pay for guided tours, but only for 1000 rupees to show me what a tree looks like. We quickly realized that this park consists mainly of flat land covered with tall grass where trees grow. Many of them seemed burnt although they were quite healthy. Perhaps that is why they looked so much because they had a dark bark and had sharp, sharp branches without leaves. The route was interesting because often the roads were uneven and rocky and sometimes the streams flowed through them. One of the roads was so profiled that it looked like a row of natural red stairs. From time to time we had to climb to the tops of the mountains and from there, of course, was a better view of the whole area. Each time we were surrounded by silence and curiosity, another world than I have seen before. It is worth mentioning here about three very characteristic places for this park. The end of the world and the end of the world (World`s End) is different only because the little is not so high and so it is not so spectacular. The end of the world is located in one of the highest points of the plateau to be earned. After a few hours of walking, often in the heat and at high humidity and after passing flat grassy terrains, we suddenly reach the edge of the plateau, which is the end of the world. Here one of the most interesting geological formations of our planet is here because the plateau ends and before us there is only a sudden drop, ie a vertical wall of 880m. Unfortunately the beautiful view is often spoiled by the fog that floats here most of the day and so was this time. It is said that there is a “foggy forest” and my interest in geography makes me want to explain in a nutshell what that is. Now the foggy forest is formed when the hot air in the valley begins to rise and is already higher up in the mist when cooling in the highlands. To me it meant that I was standing at the end of the world and had only a white wall in front of me. Another place on my route was the small waterfall named Baker. This is a nice, relaxing place located in the jungle where you can listen to the sound of falling water accompanied by monkeys.But after the great waterfalls in Laos or even in Norway, Baker’s waterfall was not extraordinary.

Soon, over the empty grassy space we reached the parking lot. But I came back with someone else because my friends were going to Hatton. When I left the park, I saw a deer standing near the road and waiting for us to throw food on him. The return journey took me shorter than before because this time we drove down. Again I observed tea fields and rice terraces and by the way I talked with people in the car who had me free. These were young people who wanted to get out of Sri Lanka and asked me to write an invitation to England because going there was their biggest dream. It is interesting that wherever I go, England and the whole of Europe seem paradise and everyone thinks that once they get there we throw money in their face. No effect does not give a translation that money is not lying on the street, and that especially for them can be very hard. They mislead the fact that 1 pound or euro costs as much as 170 rupees but nobody is aware of the cost of living in Europe and the translation is not reaching. Anyway it was nice because they brought me to the house and it was free and on the way they invited me to the dairy where they bought me strawberry milk and yogurt. (Sri Lanka sells very good dairy products). The Horton Plains National Park and World`s End were an interesting and beautiful place to visit, but unfortunately too expensive and compared to other places of this type in the world was also slightly overrated.

Bandarawela

Bandarawela is a small town that you must come across from Nuwara Eliya to Ella. For me it was just a place to hang out, but you can spend the day here, especially since it is warmer than in Nuwara Eliya and there is also a bank and a train station. This makes the town a good place to plan further travel, rest and financial affairs. As is usual in such places, the central point is the great bazaar, although it is also a pleasant temple and you can walk in the mountains.

Kubalwella intersection

Coming from Bandarawela, I had to get off at the Kubalwela junction as this bus was going to Badulla (about that later). The Kubalwel crossing is only 3km from Ella and although it does not seem interesting, for me it was another nice experience in this country. On the side of the road there are some dirty and primitive but charming cafes. I drank tea here and ate some veggie roti that rolled and fried for me. Sitting here and chatting with people I watched tea and banana fields. When it stopped raining I took my backpack and went 3km up the winding road, both sides having tea fields. Buses were on the way and some people wanted to take me for free too, but my lonely walk was too much for me. I walked slowly and stopped to take pictures among the tea bushes and when it was raining I was hiding under the banana trees. After some time I reached Ella – a very small settlement situated among the mountains, tea fields, waterfalls and several temples.

Ella

Ella is a small village in Sri Lanka, which has the biggest advantage of beautiful views. You can spend a few days walking through the mountains, among the trees and tea fields along the way passing waterfalls and temples. Unfortunately the town is typically a commercial and locals exaggerate with prices. There are a lot of expensive pubs and one luxury hotel and the internet is more expensive than in London. Fortunately, there are still places where you can spend a cheap night and eat at the local pub. As soon as I reached, after drinking the coconut content I went to seek peace. Many wanted to make me a fortune, but I found a room in a nice tourist resort located in the forest. For only 350 rupees per night I had a very large room with a double bed, a mosquito net and a private bathroom. That evening I went for a short walk but quickly got dark and spent most of the time with locals with tea, perhaps even ripped from the surrounding fields. I went to sleep fast and outside my cottage under palm trees insects “sang” all night. The next day I got up in the morning to spend all day looking at Ella or her neighborhood, which is the most interesting. I went for a walk through rice paddies and stayed for a while when I saw one of the many beautiful places. I came across an old and dilapidated Hindu temple located near the pond and between the tea fields. I thought I was alone, but the poor Tamil family lived in the temple. Outside, they had a tent attached to the wall, and in the middle there was a dirty bunk of their own and primitive cooking utensils. They said they had lived in these conditions for many years with three children but were fairly well-off because they did not know a better life. One day I saw a group of Tamil women gathering tea leaves. The field was upstairs, and they had to climb up all the time and holding bags on their backs on their heads tossing the leaves in. All were very skinny and at my sight they immediately started asking for money. When I said I did not want sweets or a pen.

In their eyes I was a rich man so they wanted anything. They said that for collecting 10kg of leaves they received 290 rupees which took almost all day. I also broke some leaves and threw them into the bag, of course they laughed. On the way I met many beggars and always asked for something. Some tried to make money by making corals from what they could find and selling them to tourists. But the natural beauty around Ella was why it was worth coming here. After a meeting with tea pickers I climbed the Adam’s Little Peak. To get there I had to go through the tea fields as usual on this part of the island and then climb up the stairs to the top of the mountain. In this area, it was the highest peak from which I saw the town and the Ella Rock, which I was after. I walked alone for a few hours between tea bushes and listened to the silence.From time to time I sat down to drink a coconut or break a papaya from a tree. It was beautiful. When I reached the town I ate roti in the company of locals and talked with a young boy who worked in a restaurant. He said he earns 5000 rupees a month, about 25 pounds. Traveling to Sri Lanka and enjoying its charms, I forget sometimes about the realities of life, but it is impossible to avoid them crossing this beautiful country on my own. The next day I went for a walk early this morning and this time I went to Ella Rock. It was a pleasant walk through the winding, mountainous roads. On both sides I had tea and banana boxes and sometimes I sat in the bamboo stables and settled over the chasm to drink a coconut and eat some mangoes. Especially here was a good opportunity because the mangos were for only 5 rupees and the big papays for 10 rupees but once I managed to break one straight from the tree. I enjoyed the environment and the delicious fruit, I talked to people and every time I had a nice time. At last I got to the railroad tracks from where I started climbing on Ella Rock. This tour was definitely more demanding and time consuming than at Little Adam’s Summit but it gave me satisfaction when I got there. It took me about three hours and on the way I passed by a small waterfall Ravana. Unfortunately it was raining and it started to fog but the visibility was good and the higher I was, the views were more beautiful. On the way back I noticed how clever the local farmers are dealing with the irrigation of vegetable fields and rice. Now they use a waterfall, which, when it enters its basin, enters the trough, which flows water, and so it watered all the fields in turn.

As before, when I was traveling in China or Vietnam, the terraces in the mountains, which cost a lot of hard work. After a successful walk and a few more coconuts and papayas, I reached the village of Ella after dark. I talked to local people, drank tea, showed me a bakery and a coconut shelf and then returned to my pretty room in the forest garden. I had to spend another night here, but I thought I would not waste my time and go on the nightly route and probably a very slow train. On the way I stopped for mandatory tea and after a little delay I left beautiful in every Ella. Ella was indeed a beautiful mountain village with splendor of tea fields, waterfalls and temples. I spent a few days here on mountain walks and I will always remember this small settlement as a very pleasant, relaxing place. The great advantage is the bars on the slopes of the mountains, where many times I sit on a fruity meal.

Badulla

While in Ella I made a trip to the nearby waterfall Dunhinda and Badulla was the town to which I had to go first. I spent here less than an hour from the busy train station, I was at the bazaar and saw children playing cricket on a big pitch. For me it was a place of change and not interesting enough to spend more time.Shortly after, I got into one of the very old government buses and drove to the Dunhinda waterfall about 5km away. I also add that Badulla is a good place to exchange because here is not only rich bus transport.In Badulla there is a pull line leading from Colombo across the whole of the Mountain Region and it is a good starting point for the east coast.

Dunhinda waterfall

The Dunhinda waterfall is 60m high and is considered to be the most beautiful in Sri Lanka. So in Ella I could not pass it. After about a 15 minute bus ride from Badulla I reached the gate of the park where I first tried some of the Latvian sweets and then paid 50 rupees for the entrance. Now 1km walk through the jungle accompanied by monkeys and birds. The road was very uneven, beautiful views and along the way there were many food stalls. I also crossed over the bridge suspended on iron ropes. By the end of the road there was a concrete terrace with a waterfall, a river and the mountains surrounding me. There were also monkeys fighting for food left here by tourists. By the time I arrived here it was advertised only as a waterfall but a walk through the jungle, the views and the company of the monkeys were trumps equally important. On the way back I was lucky because I was brought up by a group of people who came here with a work trip. On the way, of course, they asked a lot of questions about Europe and I was Sri Lanka and it was nice. At last they gave me a cup of tea as a gift and blew it at the junction of Kubalwell. From there I went 3km up the hill to get to the tea fields by the free walk to Ella.

Hatton

My next goal after Ella was to get Adam’s Summit (details later). For this I had to get to Hatton and then to Delhouse. My ride was very slow and the time was very unattractive but I thought I would save one day.But I forgot that I was traveling by train in Sri Lanka where the distance of about 80km took me almost 4h. I arrived at Hatton around 2 am and found a depopulated city. Writing a city I mean one intersection and a bus station. Fortunately there were two pubs open where I asked for a room but one room was not in the second place they wanted 1000 rupees because they saw white. Then they offered 700 rupees for just a few hours but I did not want to give them this satisfaction and I did not want to invest in this hole. I also did not want to wait all night at the court or barely drink tea all night. So I hired a rickshaw driver who took me 16km to Delhouse for just 1000 rupees. On the way there were some checks as the route was blocked for anti-terrorist reasons and it was dark and we had only one light in front of us and as we entered the bend on the mountain trail, we finally reached Delhouse.

Delhouse

The only advantage of this small village is the summit of Adam and everything that surrounds it and the town is a very good accommodation and restaurant. But I got here on the third morning and at this time there was nothing but darkness. At that moment, I was experiencing the hardest moments during this expedition because I was standing on the “end of the world” in the middle of the dark night and there were mountains and no living soul. In addition, I have not yet narrowed my eyes. Luckily, there was a lightbulb near the bus station, where the police station and police were sleeping there. I knocked on the window, explained my situation and luckily allowed me to wait for the sunrise. Another 2.5h I sat in the cold stool for interrogation but in the end I could not stand it. I left my backpack at the station and went to the top before sunrise.

Adam Peak (Sri Pada)

Adam’s summit is one of the most sacred places in Sri Lanka that has been a pilgrimage destination for over 1,000 years. As with every sacred place, there are also legends associated with several religions. The Catholic says that it was here that Adam first set foot after he was kicked out of paradise. The Buddha here Buddha left his footprint when he was on his way to paradise. The same name used in Sri Lanka or Sri Pada means holy trace. Although the season starts here in December I arrived in November because only then did I have time for it. In the season there are reportedly open lots of shops along the way where you can replenish your water supplies and the whole road is backlit as climbing is usually done at night to make it to the sunrise. Apparently since December, the sky and the valley are the cleanest because it does not cover their fog, but I climbed in November and I was lucky. I left at 5.30 am, afterwards advising and passing through the tea fields, the standing and lying statue of Buddha, the great white stupa, and several Buddhist and Hindu temples, I had the sun rise. At first it was not hard. I was fascinated with the views, the river, the mountains, and I stopped at the pictures. I had no idea that climbing the summit of 2243 meters above sea level would be so hard since I was already under Everest at an altitude of over 5200 meters. Here it was different because it was hot and humid and climbing was climbing steeply. For the most part, I had to climb the concrete stairs, and to be precise about 5200. In some parts it was so steep that I had to hold onto the handrail and walk on all fours without having a drop of water. I made up for it, because I probably missed this summit a little. When I thought it was over, it turned out to be just a turn behind which were a series of steep and high stairs.

Getting to the top took me 2.5 hours. I was tired but proud of myself and I realized that when it comes to climbing it is not always about height but also the kind of approach. Perhaps in the season when the lights are on and you can go with other people it is easier to mentally but I as usual had only myself to company and it was very heavy, lonely 2.5h. At the top was a Buddhist temple with monks living there where I spent a few hours. From the top the view was beautiful and fortunately there was no mist. Hence I have seen the whole neighborhood; lakes, fields, and a great white stupas that looked tiny. I was going to enjoy the views and go down but a nice surprise awaited me. The monks who lived there gave me a very good dinner and after that they gave me a fervent lecture on Buddhism. As for the dinner itself it was mainly rice and vegetables and fish sharply. I also tried new Latvian sweets for me and it was all delicious. We all sat in Turkish and first asked me about my religion, where I was from and asked some personal questions. Then they tried to teach me how to teach Buddhism and explain why it is the best. I thought that after the monk’s lecture in Tibet I knew a lot about Buddhism but it turned out that it was not. They said, among other things, that the main idea of ​​Buddhism is to reject violence and rule and desire to possess. Therefore, among other things, they are not interested in women and throughout their lives they meditate and study Buddhism to have pure minds and thus achieve perfection. The conversation was long and there were many arguments on both sides, but one of my friends was that while living at the top of the mountain in the temple and surrounded by beautiful nature, food and worries were perfect for exploring your soul. I said that they do not fit in their heads as it is in a big city like London where you have to work, pay for everything, ride in the crowded subway and have nasty and pissed people around. Wonder if they would be able to get as deep as here where they are now. They frowned at them for a moment, but they said that they were all rejecting for Buddhism because they did not need to live in my world to have their minds absorbed in something else. Then the conversation relaxed and explained what I had just eaten (a separate report on food in Sri Lanka). We made commemorative photos, thanked them for dinner and conversation and finally advised that there may be some women of monks here and then their meditation can take on a new dimension. They laughed and said goodbye to me again: “So you are so meditating in Poland”, and I say “that’s right”. Now there were 5200 stairs down.

As I have heard the road down, it is even heavier than the mountain, and it can crush even the hardest knees. But it went easy and in less than two hours I reached down. Almost at the bottom I met a nice guy who made me some pictures with tea pickers and Buddha statues and then invited me home for a cup of tea. When I left Sri Padi last time during this trip, I had the opportunity to break tea leaves with smiling women in my view. Also they asked me for money and sweets. At home of this man I rested a little and was very tired because in addition to such a great effort all the previous night spent on the journey. The people I met here were so nice that they brought me to Maskeliya from where I went on the way. The summit of Adam is definitely what you have to experience while in Sri Lanka. The biggest adventure is climbing alone, which many can not go through and surrender on the way. The 5200 stairs on this steep mountain and beautiful views and Buddhist temples at the top are great satisfaction. This place is unique and I do not think you should listen to the locals who say it is out of season. You can climb every season so much that the season is as it should be, that is, it is lit up the road at night and off-peak climbing takes place in solitude and can fall. For me, every element of this trip was very successful.

Maskeliya

This is a small changeover place surrounded by tea fields where buses run and where you can shop on the road, but definitely without luxury. I was here on the way to the Ancient Cities but Maskeliya is better known as a settlement between Hatton and Delhouse, through which you have to cross the road to the summit of Adam.

My way to Antique Towns

In this chapter I am going to describe my journey from Delhouse to Dambulla, my first point of interest in the Ancient Cities. I think, however, that this chapter will be a great example of how Lanzarote looks and travels through this country. Well, the first part of the trip, from Delhouse to Maskeliya, went smoothly because I was picked up by a jeep. Then I took the bus to Hatton and the 16km ride took us about two hours. I drove through the tea fields, the bus was decorated with flowers and was able to feel the homely, lanky atmosphere but 16km in two hours is a bit overdone.

When I got to Hatton after a hard drive, there was no direct bus, so I had to go to Kanda first, which I already knew. I waited there for half an hour at the train station, which was more like a combination of the old litter, the bread and the public toilet at the worst. From here I took a bus to Dambulla and when I left the Mountain Region where the average speed was 20km / h the bus drove into the lowlands where we were driving at a speed of 30-40km / h. I do not know exactly how many miles it was, but a maximum of 80, and a heavy and boring ride took me all day because I left early in the morning and got to my seat at about eight o’clock. No matter how great the adventure is in Sri Lanka, public transport can discourage travelers to such an extent that they will have seriously enough palm trees, coke, tea fields and even the ocean.

Antique City

Dambulla

After arriving at my first stop of Antique Towns I found one of the cheapest rooms so far because I paid only 300 rupees and had a double bed, windmill, mosquito net and cold water shower. At last I was able to bathe and sleep so much I was missing lately. That evening, however, I played with the dogs and talked to the young Lukers who came to visit. It turned out that each of them complained about how bad they were there and gave him a number of reasons and each of them wanted to get out wherever he could. One learned Korean and hoped that he would soon emigrate to South Korea. Indeed a pretty country (I was) but I doubt that he would see it that way. Another young man wanted to emigrate to the Middle East and would not be the first because many of the Indian subcontinent I have seen in Dubai and Kuwait. After the conversation I went to bed and the next day I went to explore. In Dambulla itself, there is nothing interesting, but there are caves from Iw BC with the richness of Buddha statues in many positions and sizes. Literature tells of one of the kings who, after being thrown out of Anuradhapura, settled down with Dambulli and ordered them to build statues that survived to this day. There are five caves, each one different, and each was created in another period and was sacred to another god. Many of the paintings on the walls were built in the 18th century. The entrance was done in great style because the museum was a huge statue of the sitting Buddha, and after I paid 10usd, I started climbing which was a nice part of this trip. Unfortunately, the tropical climate of the island made itself known because it first rained and then became hot and humid. On the way there were many souvenir dealers and necklaces and the ones I climbed the higher views were more beautiful. In addition to open areas covered with lush vegetation, you can see from here the 22km Sigiriya rock, which I will cover in the next chapter. After a short walk I got to the entrance behind which were the caves. The first was small and there was a statue of 15m lying Buddha.

The second cave was the largest and most spectacular because there were many statues of Buddha with the main altar made of statues. On the walls were painted frescoes depicting scenes from battles.In other caves pattern is the same or Buddhist statues and frescos on the walls, but they are not as great as the second temple. Interestingly, some of the Hindu caves are the motives which I think is an element of political correctness a Sri Lankan government against the Tamil minority. Caves from outside were also very interesting to me because it was a big rock in some places were specially prepared, painted white input. Dambulla Caves were beautiful and definitely worth seeing and every tourist should stay here. An interesting adventure are not only caves but also the views from the top, climbing souvenir sellers and snake charmers. Also, access is very easy because you can visit the Dambulla on a one-day trip to Kandy or on the way to Sigiriya.

Dambulla – meeting with cobra

On the way back to the caves, in addition retailers mango boy stood with two cobras, and of course I could not go past them indifferently. I am alone at home three beautiful snakes and therefore taking the opportunity I played with them. I already have experience with cobras in India and Nepal and I was curious how it is in Sri Lanka. These were not deprived of a cobra venom seemed aggressive and loud hissing. It is however not possible because the cobra only look ahead. So I took one by the tail and she was all the time trying to look menacing. However, when it lasted a little in this way he began to calm down. The second was a cobra in a basket and was distributed fairly high with a hood. So I grabbed a basket by lifting it from the rear waist height and then grabbed the back of her neck, and thus kept for a few minutes.This was also the combat readiness but seemed quieter than the other and hissed. It was another great experience this trip though others rather not recommend. The reason is simple-to die for. More on this in the article Fri.“Whisperer snakes” .

Sigiriya

Sigiriya is one of the biggest attractions of Sri Lanka as there is a large fortress built on the rock. There are also famous in the world of the fifth century frescoes painted in one of the caves, which are among the many attractions. The town itself is located near the object is not interesting. It is one, a small street full of shops and very expensive hotels because the whole village is alive with tourists. I decided that I will not be overpaid and therefore left the backpack in one of the expensive hotel and went sightseeing.

Unfortunately, I had to buy a ticket government, which cost up to 25usd. Sigiriya is covered by the “cultural triangle”, which costs 50usd and allows entrance to many facilities in the island, but I was paying separately for each input. After dropping the backpack I went in the direction of Avers great rock over the area to check the exact ticket to enter the area of ​​the gardens. On either side were the royal gardens and water pools and many brick, low buildings seemed foundations for houses. The whole environment was an interesting introduction to what I see on the rock. As I walked away I walked through the narrow streets with one another over large boulders and always accompanied me monkey. On the way to the rock I had to refuse many souvenir vendors but also met the Irishman,with the change did take pictures and with whom I could talk about travel. Finally we reached the foot of the fortress and now waiting for us to climb the steep stairs to a height of 200m (377m asl). In the middle of climbing the long, winding staircase reached the frescoes of the V depicting half-naked women. They are the only non-religious frescoes from that period, which was about 500 and to have survived only 22. I must admit that I liked, because they were nicely preserved, the colors were vivid and at the same time each of them had large, shapely breasts. Each of them was decked with jewels and flowers and all different from each other though they were painted in profile. To protect the whole cave with frescoes curtain was protected from the sun and I could not take pictures with flash.Near the frescoes of half-naked women was mirrored wall with a height of about 3m. It was coated with a special material to give it the appearance of equality and shine. However, about 1,000 years ago Sigiriya guests, visitors, after seeing the frescoes felt the need to shed their feelings on the wall and that is why today it is all covered with comments on women in the cave. I found that it gave the opportunity to the flowering of Sinhala language but more interesting to me were the same comments. Men wrote about women’s jewelry chest and the breasts themselves and the women complained that their men stared at frescoes and not at them. Moving further up, I stayed a moment to look around the beautiful surroundings. I saw the big green spaces around, the white Buddha in the distance and water terraces in front of the rock.Another interesting step climbing were “lion’s foot” from V.

A rock in the Sigriya is also known as Lion Rock because of these paws. Once under the feet, up the stairs you can go to the same jaws made of bricks or rocks and then to the top. To this day, however, they survived only because the rest of the foot almost did not survive the sixteenth centuries. Another part of the climb was very difficult, and someone who has a fear of heights would not give advice. Fortunately, there were metal stairs with handles but they were very steep and wet in the rain. After a few minutes I reached the summit, which was once covered with buildings, but today only the foundations remain. He was also here a rather large pool or body of water and the whole peak (according to experts) looked more like a palace than a rock on top of the fortress. After enjoying the beautiful views and taking some pictures I went down downcarefully watching all the time rock and its surroundings. Near the exit was another object or “cave cobra hood” having its name from the rocks arranged in the shape. At the same output in addition to the herd of monkeys they grabbed us memorabilia dealer who really wanted us to push the product for a very high price. My Irish friend gave to stretch to two things and I forgave myself this time because it was obvious that there will be the most expensive. After a while I got to town, picked up his backpack from the hotel and I wanted to get to the next place but I was told that no buses today. So I had to either spend the night in a very expensive hotel, or take a very expensive rickshaw. Anyway, as usual, everyone wanted me to stretch. So I stood on the road with my large backpack and simply waited, watching the high rock and enjoying the rain.After about a half hour bus arrived and left the Sigiriya for only 20 rupees. Both the hotel manager and rickshaw drivers were very disappointed. Sigiriya was an experience for me and another beautiful place, which must be included on the list of every traveler. I enjoyed an element of climbing and stops during which there are unique sights having its own history and legends. The summit itself was not beautiful, but the most interesting were his views and is a nice ending rewarding after reaching the summit. The first place to definitely frescoes of women.which must be included on the list of every traveler. I enjoyed an element of climbing and stops during which there are unique sights having its own history and legends. The summit itself was not beautiful, but the most interesting were his views and is a nice ending rewarding after reaching the summit. The first place to definitely frescoes of women.which must be included on the list of every traveler. I enjoyed an element of climbing and stops during which there are unique sights having its own history and legends. The summit itself was not beautiful, but the most interesting were his views and is a nice ending rewarding after reaching the summit. The first place to definitely frescoes of women.

Crossing Inamaluwa

I try to be very precise in their reportage and therefore I am describing everything that may come in handy next travelers. There are always those things that can save time and money and do not put the tourist in the position of a victim exposed to the greed of the locals. Inamaluwa intersection is small and secluded place with a bar, which is located 9km from Sigiriyi and often do not have it on maps and is very useful. The thing is, that Sigiriyi are direct buses to Dambulla and from there you can only take a bus to Polonnaruwy. In order not to lose time, I got off at the intersection of Inamaluwa and after a couple of teas and bananas in the only bar I stayed here bus going to Polonnaruwa. I think this is useful information that saved me most of all a lot of time but also a few rupees.

Polonnaruwa

Polonnaruwa was the royal capital of the Chola dynasty and Sinhala and has about 1000 years old. The city is beautiful is another remnant of the ancestors of the island. There are the ruins of cities, Buddha statues, palaces, swimming pools, harems, temples and many other buildings left behind in the jungle. The ancients kings left here as a water reservoir parks and a huge 2,500 hectare. I got here about eight in the evening and found a cheap room for only 300 rupees. How could I guess in the town itself there was nothing. Interesting was what was beyond it or antique cities and beautiful nature. The first night I went to the local pub where he became acquainted with the locals and asked about the type of food that is given to me. I went into a new and interesting monument of white,Buddha sitting where people prayed even late in the evening and then I had an interesting meeting with two rykszarzami. First he offered me that will take me on a tour of the ancient city for 2300 rupees but cost input 2700. The second one occasionally bought a ticket collecting all the antique city, whose value was 50usd but for me it was only 40usd. After all, it made sense because some tourists do not watch everything and therefore sell your rykszarzom partly used tickets. I still going to see this and other city and was wartoby save 10usd though I thought that this time how much I should pay. Rickshaw driver, however, did not give up. He said,apart from that I lease a bike for free and will drive me to the station when his rickshaw and I want to give me a ticket and collecting everything about 10usd still cheaper than if I had bought in the government’s hand. We were to meet the next morning in a hangar or bike to strike a bargain.

The next day I went to pick up a mountain bike but not agreed to the arrangement. Simply I drove away but he got into a rickshaw and chased me from holding a ticket and very advertising its advantages. I shouted that 10usd is a flimsy opportunity for me but this desperado said forget about the fact that I come from a rich country with a very poor and asks me to help him. Moreover, he did not want money from me immediately but only if will drive me to the station. I took at the end of this ticket, he smiled broadly and I drove away on the bike. I saw a lot that day, but I will tell only about the most interesting items of my cycling tour. The first building we saw were the ruins of the royal palace on the 31m high. The walls have a thickness of 3m and today it is a huge building, but unfortunately without a roof.Today, they are just massive columns with hollow holes in the beams under the floor. It is presumed that there were once 50 rooms supported by 30 columns. Before the palace is square and the lawn. Nearby there is also a small palace audiencyjny. To this day, leaving only the lower part or stairs and the sides are elephants and in the upper part of the two lions. All these rock sculptures are well preserved. In the meantime, I not bored because I have kept the company memorabilia dealers who very willingly took pictures and monkeys, which was full. No wonder because I was in the jungle. The following were pools of royal statues mouth of a crocodile, and these were also reasonably well preserved. In the vicinity of the palace pools and there is also a network of ancient city ruins of buildings which consist primarily of the ruins of a religious nature.It is the most densely built-up area of ​​the ancient city and how many archaeologists say has a style borrowed from India and Cambodia. As for many, their fate still has not been odgadnione and there are disputes on the subject. It was my first experience with the ruins in this part of the island, and after graduating I got on the bike and went on through the jungle to the north. Cycling itself was an adventure because all the time I have stayed at the ruins of a herd of monkeys standing on the road meant that I had to slow down. On the way to the ruins I saw two consecutive Shiva Devale, very well preserved and as the name suggests, are derived from Hindu temples thirteenth century.their purpose today is not odgadnione and there are disputes on the subject. It was my first experience with the ruins in this part of the island, and after graduating I got on the bike and went on through the jungle to the north. Cycling itself was an adventure because all the time I have stayed at the ruins of a herd of monkeys standing on the road meant that I had to slow down. On the way to the ruins I saw two consecutive Shiva Devale, very well preserved and as the name suggests, are derived from Hindu temples thirteenth century.their purpose today is not odgadnione and there are disputes on the subject. It was my first experience with the ruins in this part of the island, and after graduating I got on the bike and went on through the jungle to the north. Cycling itself was an adventure because all the time I have stayed at the ruins of a herd of monkeys standing on the road meant that I had to slow down. On the way to the ruins I saw two consecutive Shiva Devale, very well preserved and as the name suggests, are derived from Hindu temples thirteenth century.On the way to the ruins I saw two consecutive Shiva Devale, very well preserved and as the name suggests, are derived from Hindu temples thirteenth century.On the way to the ruins I saw two consecutive Shiva Devale, very well preserved and as the name suggests, are derived from Hindu temples thirteenth century.

Soon after, I parked his bicycle under the tree, and after drinking the contents of coconut went down the stairs to a small, concentrated collection of temples and buildings whose purpose has not yet odgadniono. Building, which amazed me the most was the “Vatadage”. Unfortunately, the roof did not survive the test of time but as a whole and was very interesting. I walked up the stairs to a small increase, and then there were the same columns and circular room with a centrally positioned, seated Buddha. On both parts of the staircase they were also reliefs. Each step was carved and in front of the entrance was often visible “moonstone”. It is a half-round, flat stone on which are carved, among others, horses, elephants, lions, cows and ducks.With the flourishing of the art of that period “moonstone” became more beautiful shapes and patterns and gained mystical significance. To sum up, “moonstone” is a boulder that is used in modern temples to pray and clean the feet before entering the temple. I mentioned earlier about the reliefs on both sides of the stairs. Characters carved on these rocks is the guards, who are supposed to protect this holy place. Temple Vatadage was very interesting (and even more if we understand its meaning), but the opposite was Hatadage. Somewhat simpler in its execution, consisting of several rooms and in the latter were three statues of Buddha. Unfortunately, here, too, there was no roof and statues, and the whole temple was destroyed by time. Nearby was also Satmahal Prasad,which resembles a pyramid composed of six storeys. Unfortunately, her destiny nothing is known. In this part of Polonnaruwy these three buildings interested me the most though was different, also worthy of attention. Then I got on the bike and rode away. I sat down for a moment at the fruit stalls and souvenir shops and are also much fun. I talked to people and once again decided to pay a coconut. My next visit was to the object Rankot Vihara. It is a great dagoba (Buddhist sacred building), which has a circular shape and spike at the very tip. Although Rankot Vihara dates back to the height of 55m and so it is only the fourth largest dagoba in Sri Lanka. Around the rooms were small, which I picked up as chapels with statues of Buddha in the middle. Their condition was different depending on the particular art.This temple is an obvious imitation of the great Dagoba in Anuradhapura, which will tell in the next chapter. My attention was also Lankatilaka that is 17 meters long, arranged in parallel, carved walls. Inside was a long corridor and finally became a headless statue of Buddha. Next to the lake and was right next to him, perhaps the biggest attraction of the whole or Polonnaruwy Gal Vihara.

It is a temple, which today represents well-preserved, large statues of Buddha. Both were made of granite and for the safety stand under the roof, which protects them from sun and rain. This is where my journey began to rain, but I think it’s good because the statues were wonderful. Standing Buddha has a height of 7m and is considered as the best of all though I personally liked more the next two. Maybe that’s why so many have seen them in many Asian countries. Standing Buddha, however, it is unique because of the position of the hands and a sad expression on his face. It symbolizes the (according to art experts) regret the passing of the Buddha Buddha in the master state of nirvana. I admire the statue next to the 14 meter high lying Buddha. I think that was perfectly executed and the attention should be paid to cushion the symbol of the sun on which he has based his head.There is also another, perfectly preserved statue of Buddha sitting with folded hands resting on his legs. He has closed his eyes and in a meditative state. I think I enjoyed the most though from what I know, in the opinion of scientists, the other two are better. Sitting Buddha was marked not only the performance but also the perfection of pure and fresh color of the rock which is amazing considering that it comes from the end of the twelfth century and has a height of up to 6m. After a beautiful and unique in its kind Gal Vihara drove away but unfortunately I was unlucky because the rain was falling apart for good. So great was the downpour that before I could hide under a tree I was all wet and my shoes were full of water.I remember this moment as the time spent alone in the ancient jungle where I could watch the great Vihara Dagoba Rankot and gathering on a branch above me running deer and monkeys. Shortly afterwards, completely soaked but happy I went away but near as I dropped the chain. With empty road got quite a long time until I came to a small lake formed in the shape of a lotus flower. Lotus Lake has a diameter of about 8 meters and 5 levels deep into the earth in the shape of the petals of this flower. It is well preserved, and I think he served the monks. With difficulty I got pushing off to another interesting building called Tivanka. I think my stubbornness was adorable as the first had to march with a broken bike up the hill and the entrance to the temple took off my shoes and poured water from them.Here, too, there are beautiful sculptures of the Buddha statue and, of course, but not the best condition and what should frescoes in Polonnaruwa rare. Being here I saw a lot more than as described in Polonnaruwa is more Dagoba and isolated ruins lying deeper in the jungle. Feature is not my lecture on the history of art but only a collection of my observations, which shows the desire to describe the best preserved and doing me the most impressive objects.which shows the desire to describe the best preserved and doing me the most impressive objects.which shows the desire to describe the best preserved and doing me the most impressive objects.

Thus ended my first part of the visit, which was to take me about two hours and took me up to five because I was so interested in everything. At the exit I was still strongly urged by souvenir sellers to buy another elephant and another Buddha statues in Sri Lanka which happens to me constantly. Hence, further pushing off, I got to the asphalt road and got out for about 3km on the straight route. It was very tiring and when I reached the town of Polonnaruwa, my friend rickshaw driver was waiting for me and gave me a new bike. But he was unhappy that it brought a broken chain. He said that in Poland the rich spoiled chains throw but Sri Lanka is poor here and repaired everything we can.Wasting no time I got on the bike and this time pedaling normally going about 2km on the other side of the ancient cities. Though it was rainy, I was happy. On one side was a large lake and across rice fields and tall palm trees. There were also characteristic of the Sri Lankan tree with an abundance of lianas and branches stuck in the ground. The whole time it was raining but I was no longer as indifferent and so I was all wet. In the second part of the ancient cities Polonnaruwy (South) also contained several interesting ruins, stupa and pools but this time I’ll tell only one building, which is the symbol of this part. It is 4m sculpture seated on a rock, depicting standing, bearded man holding in his hands and a long, curved object. I know my description is not clear, but there are many theories on the subject,Who is this character and what really keeps. First of all, this sculpture is a rarity because it represents the Buddha but an ordinary man. One theory is that this is an Indian religion teacher holding an open book. Second, it is król Parakramabahu I lived in the twelfth century. It is also the theory that the object is held in the hands of just a piece of papaya. It was a large and interesting figure and definitely worth pedaling through the flooded rice fields. After leaving the facility ate ice cream at the ice cream stalls and went in the back way to my last place of interest. It was a museum, where there was a collection of sculptures excavated from the ruins and their replicas, that I saw that day. They were presented as able to look them in the splendor of the roofs. In each room there was an exhibition devoted to another part,which was clearly shown for the layman.

All of my trip the day after the ancient cities Polonnaruwy was beautiful and gave me the opportunity to see and although superficial understanding of the history and architecture of that period. Despite the repulsion of the road, broken bike and soaking, I felt that it was a trip worth my time and money. Then I gave the bike rykszarzowi, who barely knew me because I was in such a state and then returned to her house cheap. First things started to dry but when the humidity is not much dried up. Then I took a cold shower and kept their societies me geckos and spiders living on the walls. I went for a meal where I was given too narrow rice but applause greeted me as I had a T-shirt representation of Sri Lankan cricket. In the meantime, a light went out in the whole village which reminded meI’m in a developing country. Luckily I had a flashlight. That night I was very tired and fell asleep right away, despite the fact that frogs and insects urządziły my concert. The next day early in the morning my rickshaw driver picked me up from the hostel and drove to the station as promised and I gave him his first 40usd. I drank more tea and went to Anuradhapura. As a curiosity for the adventurous traveler, I add that the tickets do not necessarily have to pay. The ruins are arranged on such a large area surrounded by barbed wire short, it can be successfully jump away from the booths guards and then go out the same way. It is very easy and I strongly urge this, especially that the government of Sri Lankans every year it gets more and more greedy in relation to tourists. For the saved money can hire a guide,who knows many interesting stories about the ruins and to do so in this way we can help the poor people and not the government, which spends money on endless war. But this is at your own risk.

Anuradhapura

My journey to Anuradhapura was quite short and on board a bus eaten by rust had a nice time because the whole time playing local music and the way traders often jumped nuts and fruits. When I arrived, the location was the same thing everywhere so far. No one knew where the hotel is, and no one spoke English well, but they wanted to get me a room for 1,000 rupees. In the end, he came and paid only 400.

I lived in a nice hostel surrounded by tall palm trees and the roofs of monkeys running around. After a while I got on the bike and went to explore the beautiful Anuradhapura. Anuradhapura is one of the most important ancient cities because it was the first capital of the Sinhalese kingdom. The city was founded in BC and 380R for over 1000 years was ruled by kings Sinhalese and South Indian invaders. Today Anuradhapura is very important because of the beautiful temples, huge Dagoba (sacred Buddhist building built in a specific style), and the remaining ruins of the ancient city in the jungle. On the way to the ancient cities I rode a bicycle through the town and after passing the stand of coconuts got there. Before me were let into the temples, at first I was thoroughly searched because of the threat of terrorism.Then I left the bike in the parking lot and went to the first temple that is the Sri Maha Bodhi. It is a holy place for all Buddhists as it is here the sacred Bodhi tree. Inoculants that tree was brought from Bodhgaya in India by the princess, whose sister introduced Buddhism in Sri Lanka. Today this place is a big tree next to the temple, prayer flags are hung around the whole area is a place of pilgrimage of the faithful. Apparently this is what inspired the sacred tree of ancient rulers to build all the wonderful buildings that are located nearby. In the middle there was always a specific atmosphere of the places of this type, there were few monks in orange suits and men bringing gifts to the Buddha.Before entering the course, I had to take off your shoes so I sat at the spot to light the candles in order to better observe the whole place. In addition to Brown Palace was, or rather what was left of it, was built about 2,000 years ago, although the last restoration took place in the XII century. It bears its name because of the roof, which was made of bronze and which has long been no. To this day, only 1,600 remained pillars once supporting a huge palace. Apparently he had nine floors and once housed 1,000 monks. Today, however, this building is not like what it used to be. For me it was just a row of pillars on the way to the next object. Along with thousands of faithful walked the narrow path, watched meditating on the side of the people and herd of monkeys. They were dangerous because everyone in their path was the enemy and especially the one who had food. They threw example.the lotus flowers that people brought in the gifts because the guards threw no stones. Before entering the next object I was thoroughly searched again here but guard me wrapped a towel from the waist down because I had shorts. This was necessary not to offend your nakedness of the Buddha and his followers.

In Anuradhapura there are many monumental, magnificent buildings but this is her wizytówką- is huge Ruvanvelisaya Dagoba. This is probably the largest Dagoba on the island, which reaches 55m height and its shape resembles a huge soap bubble with the point at the tip. Dagoba is in blue color and its construction began in BC 140R All Dagoba made a huge impression on me and I do not mean here only its size. Its shape, color similar to the color of the sky and the surrounding her big square where there were several other buildings. She stood there and Dagoba small chapel with statues of Buddha, from the floor and pillars protruded from time to time there were also places for submission of gifts. These were usually part of the coconut and lotus flowers, and then devoured by monkeys. Along with me,dagobas people walked around with folded hands and the whole place was amazing in a specific mood. Just before the entrance there was a wall with hundreds of carved elephants, standing next to a set of candlesticks and all around were the remains of joints, pillars and other details and sculptures by besieging hungry herd of monkeys. The most important, however, was Ruvanvelisaya Dagoba, which could be seen from afar. The whole place was a wonderful experience. After a while I got on the bike and riding through the green areas with palm trees got to Thuparama Dagoba, the oldest temple in Anuradhapura and perhaps the whole of Sri Lanka. This Dagoba was small because it was only 19m height but was worth seeing. It was built on a platform so I had to take the stairs, past the first reliefs guards.Thuparama was shaped like a big bell around and become a great high pillars tilted in all directions. Probably once they based on their roof, but he did not survive the test of time. As always, there were also chapels with statues of Buddha where the offerings. Always walking a few monks here which gave me a chance to take some interesting pictures. After this property, I felt that I miss because I went on a bike kilometer walk toward the parking lot to the rest of the touring combined with driving. However, there was some nice because I spent time with the locals. I drank tea in the pub under a tree surrounded by a withered plate and ate roti and chilli. It was not gourmet food, but for that in a very real environment and in good company. After this nice break I got on the bike and avoiding the monks and armed military,I got to Abhayagiri Dagoba of I in BC once she reached the height of 100m, but today it is 75m. It is also in the shape of a giant bubble and has a brick color. While I was here around the scaffolding they were set. Just before the standing pillars Dagoba also interesting though was also a large chapel with a statue of lying Buddha. It’s also a nice place to rest, the more that there are souvenir shops and ice-cream vendors obwoźni.especially since there are souvenir shops and ice-cream vendors obwoźni.especially since there are souvenir shops and ice-cream vendors obwoźni.

Then driving through the jungle came across many other interesting objects, and I had meetings with people. Wherever I was not came across the ruins of ancient cities from which only the foundations remain today and the low walls and pillars standing in a crooked way. It gave only a superficial idea of ​​how this might look like once the city. I met people here who are very small mushrooms collected from the area of ​​trees and said they are very good when cooked. Another boy caught the fish in one of the tanks and said that only this persists. So I gave him some candy because I did not ask for. Such is Sri Lanka. A beautiful country with beautiful beaches and history, but also a country very poor. Being close to the Samadhi Buddha statue seen from Iwwhich is considered one of the best preserved of Sri Lanka but in my opinion it was not as beautiful as the Buddha at Gal Vihara in Polonnaruwa. Soon after, I went to the Palace Mahasena, which looked nothing like what we imagine the palace. Again, these were the ruins, which at first glance does not look attractive but here is one of the best preserved ‘stones półksiężycowych “(explained in my coverage of the Polonnaruwa) but unfortunately was surrounded by bars for protection. In this facility very well preserved small reliefs on the stairs. I mean characteristic of the Palace Mahasena small dwarfs and lions. Of course, the same stone lunate was also the object of remarkable. Nearby were several harbor under the trees where I could relax on the benches of bamboo.Here I was given a very good fresh orange juice and then the apple wood, which was unfortunately too acidic. In any case, cheerfully I spent time here and all vendors have a huge laugh when I told them that they should treat me for free. After a while I got back on my bike and riding through the jungle got to Kuttam Pokuna or two twin ponds. They are very well preserved and are called twin although one is longer than the other 12 meters. I was in this place interesting meeting with dealers for souvenirs. First, I wanted to push everything they had for the “great opportunity”, but explained that their prices are not competitive with those in India because there is a lot cheaper. I said that many people have already bought everything in India and do not want to overpay in Sri Lanka.They admitted me right, but then they asked me to write slogans on the Polish trade because they have identified as Poles arrive in Sri Lanka whole bus and always have thick wallets. I think that a little exaggerated but I wrote phrases like “50% off” and “a great opportunity” and so on. It was very fun and I bought a souvenir spoon bamboo.

Going further through the jungle stopped for a moment at 70m Jetanavarama Dagoba, which recalls not only the shape but also the color and the embodiment previously described Abhayagiri Dagoba. I saw a few other Dagoba and the ruins of palaces, but remember that at the end of my cycling trip I got to the archaeological museum. The museum is housed in a nice old building and there are many statues of Anuradhapura, Mihintale relic from nearby and the model of one of the temples as she could ever look with a wooden roof. After dark, I left the city and antique pojeździłem the town of Anuradhapura. I wanted to organize a trip to Mihintale or rickshaw to the place where Buddhism was born in Sri Lanka and stands where a Grand Buddha but very raining and I had to get around. Besides, the game would fall here climbing,that the rain would be dangerous. So I sat down in one of the bars, parhata ate and talked with people, and then went to sleep. The next morning I was awakened monkey. Then rickshaw driver picked me up from the hotel and drove to the bus station. Here, after a cup of tea I got on the bus and left the Anuradhapura. The ancient city of Anuradhapura was admirable, and would recommend to anyone. Especially Ruvanvelisaya Dagoba and all its surroundings were particularly beautiful.The ancient city of Anuradhapura was admirable, and would recommend to anyone. Especially Ruvanvelisaya Dagoba and all its surroundings were particularly beautiful.The ancient city of Anuradhapura was admirable, and would recommend to anyone. Especially Ruvanvelisaya Dagoba and all its surroundings were particularly beautiful.

The road to Trincomalee

The rainy season began in earnest at a very slowed down my journey. Even as the Sri Lankan driving conditions would take only it lasted 3h 4h but because within a radius of 30km through the city were continuous checks on passengers. Everybody had to leave the luggage and were legitimized. I also had to show your passport, but I felt that rather curious. One young soldier asked me what the money is in Poland and that’ll take him there. The ride was long and monotonous and in addition it was raining, but when I saw the ocean mood improved.

East Coast

Trincomalee

Trincomalee (Trinco often called) in my opinion in itself is not interesting. The main advantage of this small town is that it is a base for the best beaches on the coast of north-east. These are the beaches of Nilaveli and Uppuveli. From what I noticed in the Trincomalee, it is a small town with several Hindu temples and moskami but I have not seen a single Buddhist. This area is a large population of Tamil (Hindu) and Muslims but few Syngalczyków. This is evident also in the interiors of buses where photographs are replaced with Buddha images of the gods hinduistycznych.Trincomalee is quite close to the area controlled by the Tamil Tigers because getting into or out of the city in many obwituje control what I could already see. Also the fact that there is a large Tamil community gave me the feeling,bags that are checked more thoroughly here. But she gives me this was another contact with stormy ocean, and it mattered to me. On the way out of town, I noticed that here on a heap of garbage deer come running out of the forest to feed themselves. It is interesting that they are not afraid neither people nor buses.

Uppuveli and Nilaveli

Uppuveli and Nilaveli are known localities on the coast of North wchodnim due to long white sandy beaches and turquoise water. First I drove to Uppuveli because it is closer to Trincomalee and although it is only 6km distance drive took me until half an hour. Every now and then we stopped and we drove slowly as we could find and at the end I had to pay 20 rupees instead of the 10. The whole bus was happy that I cheated on white around 10 rupees. The road on which I got out was almost empty and saw there only armed soldiers surrounded with sandbags and a primitive shed with vegetables and bananas overhanging branches. I expected here town but miscalculated.Instinctively, I went toward the ocean whipped and going through puddles and full of smashed coconuts podmurowanych got to the barracks, called the guest house. Throughout the rain and a strong wind was blowing so curiously not imagine my stay here. Despite this, I wanted to spend a few days here and live new experiences. Besides, I had a raincoat with each outfit and always went under the umbrella of palm trees. I stood in the rain between the barracks having perturbed the ocean in front of him and looking around barracks abandoned. After a while, came out of the house his grandfather, who rented me a room with a bathroom, mosquito net and fan for only 300 rupees per night but wanted to 500. Shortly thereafter, I went to swim even though the ocean was very anxious, it was raining and it was the gale. Lankijczykom was cold but I liked it.Throughout the rain and a strong wind was blowing so curiously not imagine my stay here. Despite this, I wanted to spend a few days here and live new experiences. Besides, I had a raincoat with each outfit and always went under the umbrella of palm trees. I stood in the rain between the barracks having perturbed the ocean in front of him and looking around barracks abandoned. After a while, came out of the house his grandfather, who rented me a room with a bathroom, mosquito net and fan for only 300 rupees per night but wanted to 500. Shortly thereafter, I went to swim even though the ocean was very anxious, it was raining and it was the gale. Lankijczykom was cold but I liked it.Throughout the rain and a strong wind was blowing so curiously not imagine my stay here. Despite this, I wanted to spend a few days here and live new experiences. Besides, I had a raincoat with each outfit and always went under the umbrella of palm trees. I stood in the rain between the barracks having perturbed the ocean in front of him and looking around barracks abandoned. After a while, came out of the house his grandfather, who rented me a room with a bathroom, mosquito net and fan for only 300 rupees per night but wanted to 500. Shortly thereafter, I went to swim even though the ocean was very anxious, it was raining and it was the gale. Lankijczykom was cold but I liked it.Besides, I had a raincoat with each outfit and always went under the umbrella of palm trees. I stood in the rain between the barracks having perturbed the ocean in front of him and looking around barracks abandoned. After a while, came out of the house his grandfather, who rented me a room with a bathroom, mosquito net and fan for only 300 rupees per night but wanted to 500. Shortly thereafter, I went to swim even though the ocean was very anxious, it was raining and it was the gale. Lankijczykom was cold but I liked it.Besides, I had a raincoat with each outfit and always went under the umbrella of palm trees. I stood in the rain between the barracks having perturbed the ocean in front of him and looking around barracks abandoned. After a while, came out of the house his grandfather, who rented me a room with a bathroom, mosquito net and fan for only 300 rupees per night but wanted to 500. Shortly thereafter, I went to swim even though the ocean was very anxious, it was raining and it was the gale. Lankijczykom was cold but I liked it.it was raining and it was the gale. Lankijczykom was cold but I liked it.it was raining and it was the gale. Lankijczykom was cold but I liked it.

That day I had the whole ocean to ourselves and despite the weather and the water was so warm. When it started to get dark I talked with a few people and how they could expect in this part of Sri Lanka were all Tamils. Grandfather rented a room from which said he had spent 87 years and on this beach all my life. I ordered a handful of rice and a few vegetables sharp sprat and then went to sleep. Throughout the night I could hear the ocean and sometimes even falling coconuts. The next day, I swam in Uppuveli and then went to the Nilaveli. It was a distance of 9-km because after walking through the empty road and flanked by flooded fields, I took a stuffy bus which drove me to Nilaveli. Here, too, a little surprised because the town itself Nilaveli consisted of three shops on both sides of the road. I ate here omelet and rotithen again I went to the beach. As before, it rained the whole time, but I thought that regardless of whether I will swim in the rain or wet and so I will. So I left things in the driest palm and threw in the waves for a few hours. Again, the ocean was only mine. I went for a walk along the beach, I met a fisherman complaining about fishing and I found some interesting shells and reefs thrown by the ocean. When I walked in the other direction I came across a military base and had to turn back. After another dip again went back to the pub already known to me in very modest conditions, eat lunch and I went for a walk to Uppuveli. Sometimes I have seen brick houses but most of it was very primitive. They were wooden hut covered with thatch or tin and pens were made of palm leaves.From time to time they engage children seeking contact me and asking for sweets or pens to school but also offering shuttle rickshaw driver. But I walked in the rain and even though I was all wet and looked like a pauper, I enjoyed the surroundings. In the end, the workers gave me a lift on the back of a truck and drove for several kilometers along a bumpy road. The rain was falling in my face and the local people had fun seeing white in such conditions. After returning to Uppuveli again I threw in the waves until nightfall and then, after a very modest dinner I went to sleep. The next morning I got a free bus to Trincomalee from there to get to the south-eastern coast. Uppuveli and Nilaveli this time of year were very deserted because of the weather but I still had a good time.Besides, for me it was another nice experience because I could see how people live in these parts of the island, which was different from what I’ve seen so far.

My trip to Arugam Bay

I think this will give the best coverage of the realities of a Sri Lankan transport. It was a real ordeal during which visited many filthy bus stations in several uninteresting holes.

That day I got up about 5.45 and boarded a small bus that picked me to Trincomalee, just over 6km. It took me half an hour and the driver took me 20 rupees because they do not have to spend. I boarded the bus at 7 o’clock in the morning and was not going to the banks (shortcuts) because the road was closed due to clashes with the Tamil Tigers. So I had to first go inland to then return again to the ocean. Along the way there were many military control przeszukaniami luggage which wasted a lot of time. In addition, unnecessarily I passed settlements such as Habarana, Polonnaruwa, Kalkudah, Batticaloa and Kalmunai end. I know that these names do not talk too much but, for example, such a route is like going from Polish to Germany via Hungary. To Sri Lankan roads, the state of the bus with its snail’s pace and numerous checks and tea break causedI had seriously enough. When I got to the Kalmunai almost immediately I got on the bus going crammed into a small hole called Akkaraipattu. When I got there about 17.40, it turned out that the last bus has already escaped at 17.30. But it was not a problem. One rickshaw driver said he could for me to catch up with the bus if we leave now. So I threw my backpack into a rickshaw and started to chase him. Not even surprised when we caught up with him as the bus was the slowest of the slowest and the way checks were numerous military. From a distance I could see that he was not going straight from the inside as it was packed to the brim and on the edges of one side were accosted people. When we pulled up closer, it turned out that the bus was full of soldiers armed to the teeth but still propping up with my big backpack.The soldiers helped me throw my backpack and the driver and I shifted a few rifles and so it got really last. In such conditions, after a few hours of driving through a pad of tear way and places I reached the Puttovil located only about 3 km from the Gulf Arugam. Buses, of course, it was not because the last 3km beat this trip as a passenger on a motorcycle. To sum up, I drove about 300km that day or in a normal country it would take about 3 hours, but in Sri Lanka it took until 13,5h. In addition, I will say that when it comes to traveling by train in Sri Lanka is also not doing these crazy. They are very slow and unpunctual and the seats will never decompose. Let this be a warning coverage for those who want to travel long distances for this relatively very small island.In such conditions, after a few hours of driving through a pad of tear way and places I reached the Puttovil located only about 3 km from the Gulf Arugam. Buses, of course, it was not because the last 3km beat this trip as a passenger on a motorcycle. To sum up, I drove about 300km that day or in a normal country it would take about 3 hours, but in Sri Lanka it took until 13,5h. In addition, I will say that when it comes to traveling by train in Sri Lanka is also not doing these crazy. They are very slow and unpunctual and the seats will never decompose. Let this be a warning coverage for those who want to travel long distances for this relatively very small island.In such conditions, after a few hours of driving through a pad of tear way and places I reached the Puttovil located only about 3 km from the Gulf Arugam. Buses, of course, it was not because the last 3km beat this trip as a passenger on a motorcycle. To sum up, I drove about 300km that day or in a normal country it would take about 3 hours, but in Sri Lanka it took until 13,5h. In addition, I will say that when it comes to traveling by train in Sri Lanka is also not doing these crazy. They are very slow and unpunctual and the seats will never decompose. Let this be a warning coverage for those who want to travel long distances for this relatively very small island.Buses, of course, it was not because the last 3km beat this trip as a passenger on a motorcycle. To sum up, I drove about 300km that day or in a normal country it would take about 3 hours, but in Sri Lanka it took until 13,5h. In addition, I will say that when it comes to traveling by train in Sri Lanka is also not doing these crazy. They are very slow and unpunctual and the seats will never decompose. Let this be a warning coverage for those who want to travel long distances for this relatively very small island.Buses, of course, it was not because the last 3km beat this trip as a passenger on a motorcycle. To sum up, I drove about 300km that day or in a normal country it would take about 3 hours, but in Sri Lanka it took until 13,5h. In addition, I will say that when it comes to traveling by train in Sri Lanka is also not doing these crazy. They are very slow and unpunctual and the seats will never decompose. Let this be a warning coverage for those who want to travel long distances for this relatively very small island.They are very slow and unpunctual and the seats will never decompose. Let this be a warning coverage for those who want to travel long distances for this relatively very small island.They are very slow and unpunctual and the seats will never decompose. Let this be a warning coverage for those who want to travel long distances for this relatively very small island.

Puttovil

Pottuvil a small fishing village located only 3km from Arugam Bay-famous to tourists. This is a very good place to do banking matters, eat and do a little bit cheaper cheaper purchases. With Arugam Bay you can do a walk here and certainly will not be time wasted because many times you stop and enjoy nature. Alternatively, you can get here by bus for about 8 rupees though none of rykszarzy living here since the birth of the bus never heard of. Arugam Bay of rickshaws should cost not more than 50 rupees one way while trying to take even 200. On the way from Trincomalee stayed in Pottuvil a few minutes to relax, eat and drink parhata tea.In the pub where everyone wanted to sell me something or give me a ride somewhere I met an elderly Englishman with whom I spent a nice time to talk. He told me his travels and that he never did not want to go back to England. During this conversation I took the opportunity and I mentioned my last 20 pounds on the black market. To Pottuvil returned two more times. I had to do a little shopping and go to the bank. Just course the bank was better that day than on the black market, but sometimes it pays to get less and save nerves and questions for which no answer. The Sri Lankan bank was terrible mess and a huge bureaucracy but still compared with the bank in Bangladesh, and so was the good level.During this conversation I took the opportunity and I mentioned my last 20 pounds on the black market. To Pottuvil returned two more times. I had to do a little shopping and go to the bank. Just course the bank was better that day than on the black market, but sometimes it pays to get less and save nerves and questions for which no answer. The Sri Lankan bank was terrible mess and a huge bureaucracy but still compared with the bank in Bangladesh, and so was the good level.During this conversation I took the opportunity and I mentioned my last 20 pounds on the black market. To Pottuvil returned two more times. I had to do a little shopping and go to the bank. Just course the bank was better that day than on the black market, but sometimes it pays to get less and save nerves and questions for which no answer. The Sri Lankan bank was terrible mess and a huge bureaucracy but still compared with the bank in Bangladesh, and so was the good level.The Sri Lankan bank was terrible mess and a huge bureaucracy but still compared with the bank in Bangladesh, and so was the good level.The Sri Lankan bank was terrible mess and a huge bureaucracy but still compared with the bank in Bangladesh, and so was the good level.

Arugam Bay

Arugam Bay is a small fishing village but recently more and more popular holiday resort where some of the best conditions for surfing. For several years, this is one of the best places on the southeastern coast of the island. I was lucky because I came here out of season and I was able to spend three nights for only 1000 rupees. I got a very nice room with a separate bathroom, fan, double bed and a mosquito net. Throughout the first day I swam in the ocean and enjoyed the beautiful weather and nature. The beach fishermen worked the nets and I was finding it more and more beautiful corals and rare fish that were not fit to eat. One of them was, for example. Echidna, which can inflate the developing spines. It is not suitable to eat because it is poisonous but still cooks are specialistswho can prepare it so as not to poison. It is especially popular in Japan, where people are looking for “meal with a thrill”, which many do not survive.

The whole day passed me on the swimming and walking on the shore of the ocean. In the evening I met on the shore fisherman who fished and asked if I could help him. He agreed, and it was great fun for me. On one hand, the alleged fishing line were three hooks and thus for one throw, I managed to catch two fish. I saw that it was close to the Englishman, who was doing the same as me and Sri Lankan fishermen sat leaning against the boats and smoked cigarettes. For us it was a great pleasure and they had the rest. The fisherman was so pleased with my catch, he invited me to his house and caught fried fish for me and for your family. It was a great opportunity not only to spend time with the Sri Lankan family but also to eat fresh fish, which were very expensive restaurants. He received me nicely and then we talked about Europe,about money and what I have seen in Sri Lanka. I also liked the fisherman house and how he lived it. He had a house, brick and painted green, had a big garden but unfortunately gritty and its area grew mango trees, coconuts and papayas. Every evening he went to the ocean to catch your dinner and the fruit was on the doorstep. He had plenty of space for himself, lived in the beautiful open air and not have to worry about shopping, bills, etc. I told them that all of them, it seems that life is better in Europe, but said that is not true. It is only more stressful and much more expensive. Living in Sri Lanka without money you can survive on fish and fruit while in Europe without money would be tragic. The next evening I met again the same fisherman, again, I caught fish for him and invited me again to himself.This time, however, brought sweets for his children. After a very pleasantly spent time, the next day I started swimming and jumping in the waves and then organized a trip. Everyone rickshaw driver offered to me and the competition between them was huge. I went away to the lake several kilometers behind the village of Panama. There I was able to see some interesting birds and crocodiles, but once again confirmed my opinion that says that if you want to see the dream of his animal, it is best to go to the zoo. Still, I was happy because the whole trip was enjoyable. Crocodiles, however, were very shy and did not give a shoot close-ups. On the way back we stopped in a small booth for tea but also a lot of times I could see grazing buffalo, birds patrolling the fields in search of frogs and insects.Once I also saw an old man who was washing his team on a flooded buffalo field. All these views were not described in the guide and proves that it is always worth it to get out beyond the human settlements to see the countryside and nature of this exotic country. On the way back my rickshaw driver dropped me off about 3km from the village of Arugam at Crocodile Rock. From there I walked along the shore dropping from time to time and throwing into the waves to take pictures of palm trees next to the ocean background. I swam in a standing, salty lake on the other side of the beach and all the happiness that someone warned me that there may also be crocodiles. For the rest of the day I swam, I ate fruit, fished fish and I played great. It was my last night in the beautiful Arugam Bay.All these views were not described in the guide and proves that it is always worth it to get out beyond the human settlements to see the countryside and nature of this exotic country. On the way back my rickshaw driver dropped me off about 3km from the village of Arugam at Crocodile Rock. From there I walked along the shore dropping from time to time and throwing into the waves to take pictures of palm trees next to the ocean background. I swam in a standing, salty lake on the other side of the beach and all the happiness that someone warned me that there may also be crocodiles. For the rest of the day I swam, I ate fruit, fished fish and I played great. It was my last night in the beautiful Arugam Bay.All these views were not described in the guide and proves that it is always worth it to get out beyond the human settlements to see the countryside and nature of this exotic country. On the way back my rickshaw driver dropped me off about 3km from the village of Arugam at Crocodile Rock. From there I walked along the shore dropping from time to time and throwing into the waves to take pictures of palm trees next to the ocean background. I swam in a standing, salty lake on the other side of the beach and all the happiness that someone warned me that there may also be crocodiles. For the rest of the day I swam, I ate fruit, fished fish and I played great. It was my last night in the beautiful Arugam Bay.On the way back my rickshaw driver dropped me off about 3km from the village of Arugam at Crocodile Rock. From there I walked along the shore dropping from time to time and throwing into the waves to take pictures of palm trees next to the ocean background. I swam in a standing, salty lake on the other side of the beach and all the happiness that someone warned me that there may also be crocodiles. For the rest of the day I swam, I ate fruit, fished fish and I played great. It was my last night in the beautiful Arugam Bay.On the way back my rickshaw driver dropped me off about 3km from the village of Arugam at Crocodile Rock. From there I walked along the shore dropping from time to time and throwing into the waves to take pictures of palm trees next to the ocean background. I swam in a standing, salty lake on the other side of the beach and all the happiness that someone warned me that there may also be crocodiles. For the rest of the day I swam, I ate fruit, fished fish and I played great. It was my last night in the beautiful Arugam Bay.I caught the fish and I played great. It was my last night in the beautiful Arugam Bay.I caught the fish and I played great. It was my last night in the beautiful Arugam Bay.

South Coast

On the way Mirissy

This relatively short section, but still very long as Sri Lanka defeated in more than 10h. I fled to the bus in Monaragala, I had a few breaks for tea and parhata and as usual there were several military control, once even with a dog. The closer to the coast was the views were beautiful. Quite a long time I watched from the window charming beaches and palm trees and from time to time on the bus jumped seller pineapple and mango. My penultimate stop was Matara where he began to clear and where the next bus arrived to Mirissa.

Matara

Matara is located at the end of the train to the south of the island, among other leading here from Colombo. For me it was just a town you interchange on the way to Mirissy but I noticed a few things. On the one hand it is larger and noisy town, especially around the bus station and on the other hand, there is a beautiful coastline with turquoise water and the quiet beach to stroll among the palm trees. Across the street from the train station there is a Buddhist temple on the island on which you enter the modern bridge. Nearby is a coral reef. Matara is a good place for transport and is well stocked. Just before the city saw fishermen catching fish log is penetrated into the bottom of which is one of the flagships of Sri Lanka.

Mirissa

Mirissa is frequented resort, famous because of the wonderful beaches, palm trees and warm, turquoise water. It is also quieter than other area has long been known centers of this type. When I got off the bus I went in search of the room and I was very unpleasantly surprised by the prices. Fortunately, I managed to find a very nice room with a double bed, fan and mosquito net. She was also a very nice bathroom and a small office and all for only 500 rupees per night. I had a view of the beach and the palm trees, monkeys sat high. The time that I spent in Mirissie was fabulous. I walked along the beach, bathed in the ocean, fruit and eaten like that for two whole days. One evening decided to pay a very romantic dinner but unfortunately alone. I sat down at the beach restaurant where tables stood on the sand and the ocean was washing my feet.For this was the glow of the moon and the stars and palm trees.

I ordered a steak of fish with salad and finished pancake. Everything was excellent, of course, although quite expensive but on the other hand, I spent a wonderful time and certainly was not as expensive as in Europe. On the last day I did not jump in the waves but longer swam in the lagoon and watched underwater life. I accompanied the children and their dog, which, unfortunately, he began to ask for money and pens. It was wonderful. Once swam then dived or sitting on the truncated palm observing surroundings. Mirissa is unfortunately a little way as the natives we no longer know how to take money from tourists. But it is output. You can live on the other side of the road and not from the ocean and eat in local pubs on the road because it just for the beauty of the ocean, after not paying. Anyway, it was great and I would recommend anyone who is in Sri Lanka.Here you can feel why Sri Lanka is famous for its paradise beaches.

Televijaya and the snake farm

Being in Mirissa I took a short trip by bus to the farm hoses. Being a big fan of these beautiful animals and having a few large constrictors at home I could not get around. With Mirissy journey took me about half an hour with a change in busy Weligama. When I got to the Televijaya people pointed me snake farm even if I did not ask for it and so I got there quickly. It’s a shame that the owner of the farm was very adamant about the price because I had to pay 500 rupees which he has never regretted. He took me to a separate room where he kept snakes. He had a large collection of cobras and vipers and a small tiger python. He also said that no Sri Lankan mamba but it seemed very suspicious because it is interested in snakes for many years and I am sure that reside solely mamba Africa.They looked more like snakes than mamba because it does not have the characteristics of Mamba I know. As for cobras, amongst other things, a white cobra, king cobra and Indian. Very loudly hissed when they were disturbed. Their guardian was taking them for me from the vivarium, but unfortunately does not let me hold them. He showed me for it bites. He said that he had become resistant because every now and then inject a small amount of their venom. After all, I came to the asphalt road without haste have time to observe nature. On both sides of the road had rice fields, water buffalo soaking in the mud and white birds patrol the area in search of small animals. Once I could also see large a monitor, which even made an impression on the locals. I stayed here for an omelet and a cup of tea at a local pub and then also returned to the Weligama Mirissy.As for cobras, amongst other things, a white cobra, king cobra and Indian. Very loudly hissed when they were disturbed. Their guardian was taking them for me from the vivarium, but unfortunately does not let me hold them. He showed me for it bites. He said that he had become resistant because every now and then inject a small amount of their venom. After all, I came to the asphalt road without haste have time to observe nature. On both sides of the road had rice fields, water buffalo soaking in the mud and white birds patrol the area in search of small animals. Once I could also see large a monitor, which even made an impression on the locals. I stayed here for an omelet and a cup of tea at a local pub and then also returned to the Weligama Mirissy.As for cobras, amongst other things, a white cobra, king cobra and Indian. Very loudly hissed when they were disturbed. Their guardian was taking them for me from the vivarium, but unfortunately does not let me hold them. He showed me for it bites. He said that he had become resistant because every now and then inject a small amount of their venom. After all, I came to the asphalt road without haste have time to observe nature. On both sides of the road had rice fields, water buffalo soaking in the mud and white birds patrol the area in search of small animals. Once I could also see large a monitor, which even made an impression on the locals. I stayed here for an omelet and a cup of tea at a local pub and then also returned to the Weligama Mirissy.Very loudly hissed when they were disturbed. Their guardian was taking them for me from the vivarium, but unfortunately does not let me hold them. He showed me for it bites. He said that he had become resistant because every now and then inject a small amount of their venom. After all, I came to the asphalt road without haste have time to observe nature. On both sides of the road had rice fields, water buffalo soaking in the mud and white birds patrol the area in search of small animals. Once I could also see large a monitor, which even made an impression on the locals. I stayed here for an omelet and a cup of tea at a local pub and then also returned to the Weligama Mirissy.Very loudly hissed when they were disturbed. Their guardian was taking them for me from the vivarium, but unfortunately does not let me hold them. He showed me for it bites. He said that he had become resistant because every now and then inject a small amount of their venom. After all, I came to the asphalt road without haste have time to observe nature. On both sides of the road had rice fields, water buffalo soaking in the mud and white birds patrol the area in search of small animals. Once I could also see large a monitor, which even made an impression on the locals. I stayed here for an omelet and a cup of tea at a local pub and then also returned to the Weligama Mirissy.He showed me for it bites. He said that he had become resistant because every now and then inject a small amount of their venom. After all, I came to the asphalt road without haste have time to observe nature. On both sides of the road had rice fields, water buffalo soaking in the mud and white birds patrol the area in search of small animals. Once I could also see large a monitor, which even made an impression on the locals. I stayed here for an omelet and a cup of tea at a local pub and then also returned to the Weligama Mirissy.He showed me for it bites. He said that he had become resistant because every now and then inject a small amount of their venom. After all, I came to the asphalt road without haste have time to observe nature. On both sides of the road had rice fields, water buffalo soaking in the mud and white birds patrol the area in search of small animals. Once I could also see large a monitor, which even made an impression on the locals. I stayed here for an omelet and a cup of tea at a local pub and then also returned to the Weligama Mirissy.buffalo soaking in the mud and white birds patrol the area for small animals. Once I could also see large a monitor, which even made an impression on the locals. I stayed here for an omelet and a cup of tea at a local pub and then also returned to the Weligama Mirissy.buffalo soaking in the mud and white birds patrol the area for small animals. Once I could also see large a monitor, which even made an impression on the locals. I stayed here for an omelet and a cup of tea at a local pub and then also returned to the Weligama Mirissy.

Unawatuna

With Mirissy Unawatuny going to only one hour and it was very nice. The whole time I had views of the ocean and palm trees and stopped for a break, a delicious ice cream dessert in coconut. Unawatuna is better known and also very popular holiday resort on the south coast. I immediately liked it here, although it was very commercial. And also the only main street was filled with more expensive and cheaper pubs, souvenir shops and studios where were created a very interesting sculpture. Of course, I was spotted by money hungry rickshaw drivers his commission, who wanted to take me to the hotel of your choice. One got me a room for 2,000 rupees a night while I arranged for myself for 400 rupees. Here confirms my old review of rickshaw drivers throughout the subcontinent, not only in Sri Lanka.As usual on this beautiful island I had a very nice room with a separate shower, a fan and a mosquito net. Every time enumerate all these things because every time I compare Sri Lankan to Indian conditions where I stayed in many hotels with horror stories. Being in this paradise did not want to waste time sitting in the room. After a while I left the room and came to the beautiful beach. I have been on many in different parts of the world but here was exceptionally beautiful. Unawatuna differed, however, from Mirissy. Here we were built on the beach restaurants and hotels while Mirissa was undeveloped and peaceful. In Unawatunie edge of the plate it was very briefly and then was immediately fall down. But most importantly, that the ocean itself was warm and had the most turquoise blue I have ever seen. Long hours just swam,I am lying on the water and shells after diving. Once I swam near the sea turtle, which is quite a lot here. After many hours in the water went out on coconut and papaya again and saw a turtle and then dived again. So I spent the whole day and it seemed to me that I could go still. In the evening I went for a walk down the main street and most of the time I spent in the sculpture studios. In addition to the Buddha statues of elephants and cobras were also many masks of the strangest shapes, opening a box on the principle of leverage, and many others. Wherever we went the selection was huge. Then once again I bought a large papaya, then went with her to the shore, sat down in the restaurant at the banana juice and watched the ocean so late. The next morning I was doing roughly the same thing even though I had the opportunity to try something new.After swimming in the ocean I went ashore and saw that the fishermen standing on the shore noticed a school of sardines. Quickly jumped into the boat and cast their nets around them and I swam and dived behind the boat for a few meters to watch everything closely.

Sardines were trapped in the network and knocked about her and some leaped out of the water to freedom even about half a meter. For shallower water fishermen hauling nets on the shore and sardines (very small and agile) leaped often hitting their faces, but the most interesting was their struggle for life under water. After some time fished with a fishing net but they were not the only sardines. Accidentally got here too poisonous fish echidna (described in the report of Arugam Bay). After this interesting experience, I went to the end of the beach to swim in the shallow lagoon. Here only I dived and watched the fish swimming below me. It was a lot of interesting and colorful species of small fish are not worthy of any marine aquarist. I swam a long time,I walked the shores and occasionally jumped into a warm ocean to dive with the hope of seeing another sea turtle. It was wonderful. I have read a few people who advised me how to live cheaply in Sri Lanka, but it will tell in another chapter. Walking down the main street I saw a lot of interesting phenomena, and I’m not talking just about my favorite sculptures. Once passed by the way disputes waran and another time I saw a bird, a lizard who kidnapped before my legs and flew with her to the young tree nearby. Sri Lanka is full of this type of phenomena and I was lucky to be witness to many. In Unawatuna found a man who cooked for me because it was very expensive everywhere. For 100 rupees getting the whole plate of rice with vegetables and curry,sardines and coconut while elsewhere I would have to pay a minimum of 250 rupees. Besides, as usual in Sri Lanka, the rest being replaced coconuts, mangoes and papajami though I had a lot of other fruits. After a few days left in Unawatuna, and I wished I could have stayed longer. I lived in paradise and the Rajsk. I sincerely recommend to any traveler.

Galle

Being in Unawatuna I made a trip to the city located near Galle primarily to see the Dutch fort. As soon as I entered this port city immediately I saw the boat and fish markets, rich in many species of fish. I went on a vegetable bazaar where he stared at cheap fruit. There were pineapples, papayas, mangoes, bananas and watermelons small but still the most interesting was the fish market. Galle is a historic town and one of the largest ports in Sri Lanka but lost its importance when the much larger port was opened in Colombo. For tourists it is an attractive city mainly because of the Dutch fort built by the Dutch 1663 years. When I entered through the main gate immediately they threw me in the eyes old Dutch streets.

Even some of the names of the streets were still Dutch name. This does not mean, however, that the Dutch fort was built by the Dutch only. His contribution here are the Portuguese, then the Dutch tweaked what the others began after the departure of the Dutch and their contribution to the building they were also British. For example, the main gate was built by the British in 1873, though examples of this are many. Immediately upon entering I went to a few museums. In one of them were maps, plates, dishes, decorations and many other things left here by the colonizers. Next door was a jewelry store with a wealth of precious metals and stones. Seller really wanted me to pull on the famous Sri Lanka moonstone and he wanted me to press it until the 70 pounds while on the beach could buy similar for 300 rupees.As we have seen in Sri Lanka you need to watch out for scammers, who in a very nice way, smiling from ear to ear, and speaking very nice English squeeze anything for the big money. Besides, I saw the Dutch church, a few other museums but rather an average of interesting and best of all was the walk through the thick ramparts. On the one hand I had the old buildings of the fort and on the other the Indian Ocean ‘s bound by fortified walls. I had a companion Scot and a few Australians and walking together we were able to exchange experiences from the trip. The Scot was dressed in national costume Sri Lankans or “sarong” -one piece of cloth wrapped around the waist, which I think works in this climate.Our walk started from the lighthouse stopping for fortified sites on the shores of the ocean to observe the surroundings from there. Some places we could not go because they were occupied by the military but it’s enough. When dusk settled, accompanied by stray dogs came to the clock tower that is one of the important points of the fort. Hence, a nice view of the ocean, the city of Galle, cricket field and one more clock tower. This was in town and was not attractive or historic like this inside the fort but it was bound to a story. When the 2004 tsunami hit Sri Lanka, many buildings were destroyed but the tower still standing there intact. Beyond just the detail that stopped at the time and in memory of this event is not repaired.My time at the fort of Galle was very informative and it was another valuable experience. I think it is very important for the traveler stop for a few hours proving that the southern coast of Sri Lanka is not only a paradise beaches but also the history and remarkable architecture. Besides fish and bazaars same atmosphere of this small port city it is also very interesting.

My other experiences

I decided to write this chapter to advise prospective traveler to what you can expect from people eating, what are the unwritten customs here (positive and negative), and how to live cheaply and well in this beautiful country for some time.

Sri Lankans

Generally people here are very nice and I have never met with any danger. But being here I feel like a walking pound sterling as it seems to me that every conversation comes down to money, and although I was already in many countries have never met people so money hungry. In addition, the Sri Lankans are very curious, and each time when I know I ask a lot of personal questions. First, they want to know where I came from and my name. Then if I am in Sri Lanka for the first time, and if I like and what I think about the people. Next comes a series of very personal questions or if I have a wife and children, and if so how much. They also want to know where I work, and most importantly how much I make. All these questions can ask for one minute and you do not already have ideas for other things to pass then.They ask if not to get me a room (for double the price, of course). I want to sell images or indicate restaurant and when all the answers are no, then they want to sell me grass or woman. As soon as the Sri Lankans when they see a white man is a delight as the coconut eg. That costs more than 20 rupees one guy wanted me to push for 50. My advice is be nice to them but very firm because without a strong character one can quickly lose all the money every pay more together. Repeatedly going to the pub I had to argue first for me because it was often double the price. Sri Lankans in themselves also are nice. For example, I always bow down and give me the items in a very polite way of styling me “sir.” They also have a sense of humor and you can always make a deal with them. I think,that plays a role here too which makes Buddhism, they are always inclined peacefully and kindly. As usual, however, the distance from the rule are rickshaw drivers, where you can not believe in anything under any circumstances.

Food

Traveling through Sri Lanka for almost a month I had the opportunity to try very rich in flavors and colors of local food and that is why I decided to write about a separate chapter. In my experience all the basic food is rice dishes because you do not have to import it. To this are added many flavors in vegetables and fish, chicken or egg. As before in India as well in Sri Lanka is a lot of curry and biryani. I would say that Sri Lankan cuisine is rather sharp but still not as spicy as Thai cuisine or south-eastern China where according to me is a chili dish was basic. Sri Lanka spices are what falls on a wealth of flavors. This is usually a curry, chilli, cinnamon, coconut milk, garlic and grated and dried seafood. When I ordered dinner,usually it was a plate of rice or banana leaf and the sides were spicy vegetables and dal-only mild dish. To sum up, the food is similar to that in India, but depending on the condition, of course. All cheap restaurants and pubs always my plate was covered with foil and disposable cutlery my steaming. Another specialty is the Sri Lankan roti or vegetables or egg with vegetables spicy or sweet wrapped in a pancake. It is a pity that we always kneaded and fed them with dirty paws and sometimes laid them on the dirty trash. Another variation is parhata or roti pancake without any additives. Being on the ocean many times I have eaten many delicious species of fish, usually with rice, vegetables and coconut. Dessert are very good fruits. These are mainly mangoes, coconuts, papayas, durians, rambutan,jackfruit wood apple and although there are also apples, tangerines, pineapples, bananas and grapes several species. Each of these fruits has its own unique taste and appearance and is a very good dessert. I described many of these fruits in my reportage about Thailand when I drove to Hat Yai. Sri Lanka is also home to some sweets. In addition to chocolate milk, ice cream and yoghurt is very good lots of sweets unique to this island. First I have come across to halapa or concoction of honey, flour and coconuts wrapped in a leaf and having a hard consistency of jelly. Another specialty is Dodola or Jelly cake whose main ingredient is rice, coconut and milk. Often thrown him nuts and chopped fruit. In general, most sweets in Sri Lanka includes rice and coconuts because of these two components is here too much.Also, many dishes are fried in coconut oil. When I climbed Sri Pada, at the top of the monks They gave me samapose or ugniecionymi, sweet balls also made out of coconut, milk and nuts. Another delicacy is appe that is cheap and quick snack for 10 rupees. This is another kind of pancake, whose only ingredients are coconut milk and rice powder.

However, I think I could write a separate chapter of the same coconuts, which are used to everything here, not only to eat and there are a few types. First of all, the coconut is known as a refreshing drink that is very healthy and cheaper than artificial drinks. With coconut oil is also used for making, chips, alcohol, it is the basis of many spices and dishes, leftovers are animal feed and its fiber is used on brushes, ropes and other household items. Its shell is used in the temples where it brings happiness and breaking the tradition is that the first baby food and the dish served at weddings is kiri bath or rice cooked in coconut milk. Finally, the coconuts are used in construction and does not waste anything.With strong coconut trees gets the board and skeletons of houses and fences and the leaves are used to make roofs and fences. Are also made of them tacky souvenirs for tourists. If you have not described any of the possibilities of using coconut I apologize. I also think that what I wrote about them can be applied to any other country where there is plenty of coconut palms at every step. I am thinking of India and Asia, and South-East where coconuts are many plant life saving because no part of the coconut palm should not go to waste.I am thinking of India and Asia, and South-East where coconuts are many plant life saving because no part of the coconut palm should not go to waste.I am thinking of India and Asia, and South-East where coconuts are many plant life saving because no part of the coconut palm should not go to waste.

How to live in Sri Lanka

For every beautiful country, which has already visited always want to come back and I always ask the locals for advice on how to do it best and cheapest. People pay a lot of money for a very short vacation under palm trees and when they are in place are robbed because tourists are paying the price. Here is my recipe for Sri Lanka or how to live three months or half a year and have a minimum cost of living away from work, duties, taxes and bills. The funny thing is that this is the most real and you do not have to be rich to have a tranquil life over the turquoise warm ocean. Sri Lanka is more expensive than the rest of the Indian subcontinent except the Maldives. On the same flight I can not do anything about it except to buy well in advance although it is not cheap. While I was here I paid £ 411 for the flight lines Kuwaiti.The Government of Sri Lankans grants visa for three months, which can be easily extended to six months. From what I learned I could rent a house with kitchen, bathroom living room and a small garden z palmą coconut for about 100 to 150 pounds per month as compared to European prices is still a joke. This would be a house very close from the ocean. As far as food is absolutely a must forgive restaurants and places crowded with tourists. Let us remember that the local people also need somewhere to go shopping and so near each wonderful beach full of white, within a few kilometers of the town is always local people who buy the local-ridiculously cheap prices for us. A kilo of rice costs 60 rupees, pineapples and mangoes are 10 rupees and papayas also in this price.From what I learned I could rent a house with kitchen, bathroom living room and a small garden z palmą coconut for about 100 to 150 pounds per month as compared to European prices is still a joke. This would be a house very close from the ocean. As far as food is absolutely a must forgive restaurants and places crowded with tourists. Let us remember that the local people also need somewhere to go shopping and so near each wonderful beach full of white, within a few kilometers of the town is always local people who buy the local-ridiculously cheap prices for us. A kilo of rice costs 60 rupees, pineapples and mangoes are 10 rupees and papayas also in this price.From what I learned I could rent a house with kitchen, bathroom living room and a small garden z palmą coconut for about 100 to 150 pounds per month as compared to European prices is still a joke. This would be a house very close from the ocean. As far as food is absolutely a must forgive restaurants and places crowded with tourists. Let us remember that the local people also need somewhere to go shopping and so near each wonderful beach full of white, within a few kilometers of the town is always local people who buy the local-ridiculously cheap prices for us. A kilo of rice costs 60 rupees, pineapples and mangoes are 10 rupees and papayas also in this price.bathroom living room and a small garden z palmą coconut for about 100 to 150 pounds per month as compared to European prices is still a joke. This would be a house very close from the ocean. As far as food is absolutely a must forgive restaurants and places crowded with tourists. Let us remember that the local people also need somewhere to go shopping and so near each wonderful beach full of white, within a few kilometers of the town is always local people who buy the local-ridiculously cheap prices for us. A kilo of rice costs 60 rupees, pineapples and mangoes are 10 rupees and papayas also in this price.bathroom living room and a small garden z palmą coconut for about 100 to 150 pounds per month as compared to European prices is still a joke. This would be a house very close from the ocean. As far as food is absolutely a must forgive restaurants and places crowded with tourists. Let us remember that the local people also need somewhere to go shopping and so near each wonderful beach full of white, within a few kilometers of the town is always local people who buy the local-ridiculously cheap prices for us. A kilo of rice costs 60 rupees, pineapples and mangoes are 10 rupees and papayas also in this price.that local people also need somewhere to go shopping and so near each wonderful beach full of white, within a few kilometers of the town is always local people who buy the local-ridiculously cheap prices for us. A kilo of rice costs 60 rupees, pineapples and mangoes are 10 rupees and papayas also in this price.that local people also need somewhere to go shopping and so near each wonderful beach full of white, within a few kilometers of the town is always local people who buy the local-ridiculously cheap prices for us. A kilo of rice costs 60 rupees, pineapples and mangoes are 10 rupees and papayas also in this price.

For this, all the rest of the vegetables and fruit, which is also cheap. If you do not trust retailers can go with Sri Lankan colleague who wytarguje us a fair price. Sri Lanka is a country of delicious fish. So for example, a small chop in a restaurant costs up to 600 rupees and a large fish market fish, which feed the whole family for 4 days costs 100-150 rupees. Of course, buying fish is not always necessary because I fished alone and then in addition to the savings I had the great satisfaction. Fishing lines, hooks and bait are sold everywhere for a few rupees. You also need to remember to move only local transport. In this way, you can spend a few great living. The ocean, beautiful weather and palm trees is not yet paying. If someone thinks that it is still too expensive, I recommend South India. There flightlife and are cheaper six-month visa and is also beautifully.

West Coast

Hikkaduwa

The ride to Hikkaduwa was short and pleasant and as before all the way I had beautiful views of the ocean.On the spot I quickly found a very nice large room with a double bed and all I needed for only 400 rupees per night. Before I managed to get acquainted with the surroundings, I went to the beach I had just before my room. First came a palm tree rising parallel to the water mirror and then dived and rushed into the waves. Being on shallow water I once saw a sea turtle. Hikkaduwa is a famous town in Sri Lanka because of its beautiful beaches and good diving and surfing conditions. As you can easily guess the part for tourists is very commercial and therefore within a radius of about 4km there are hotels, restaurants and souvenir shops geared towards every budget. My first moments spent on the ocean but then I became interested in the main street. Especially the souvenir shops I liked very much because they were like art museums. I spent many hours admiring canvases and sculptures. Especially masks were very ingenious because they depicted human faces and their caricatures in a very sophisticated way. It was unfortunately more expensive than in Unawatuna, but I was able to find a few cheaper shops and cheap local pubs where the locals were. It was another opportunity to eat roti in many variants and to drink another Ceylon tea. After another swim in the ocean and walking the beach until dark, I went to a luxury hotel where I was allowed to swim for free. The next day I wanted to do something else because Hikkaduwa is not just beaches, ocean and shops. Inside the town there is also a lot to offer and I went for a one-person bicycle tour.

First, I went to the town of Hikkaduwa where local people are buying for normal prices. It was a great charm. I drove around a small harbor and saw a fish market where there were large art exhibits and then I stopped for breakfast in the most ordinary pub for the next roti and Ceylon tea. It was poor and ordinary and at the same time natural. I went inland and first saw a Buddhist temple on the hill. Outside stood a white dagoba, and there was a great statue of the sleeping Buddha and interesting paintings nearby.Around the palm trees grew and very nice monks told me some things about their temple. By the way, I was watching the nature, the children hooked me up asking for pens and pens. Then I went to Lake Hikkaduwa, which is home to waran and numerous birds, but that day I had a bad luck because I rode the lake around and saw only the hogs. Anyway, I enjoyed having a bike ride among the palm trees and accompanied by dogs. At the crossroads I stopped for a while in the wooden barrack where the fruit was sold. I drank the contents of two coconuts and for dinner I bought papaya and some small bananas. Fruits were always delicious and very cheap. I was happy to spend the day on my bike and I was glad I did more than spend my time in the ocean. On that day I was still diving, then swimming in a luxury hotel and admiring art at the very end. I also talked to a few sales people with sweet papaya. I was able to buy a wooden relief depicting a woman from the 5th century fresco on the rock in Sigiriya. I thought it would be a good souvenir because the beaches, the ocean, the elephants and the tea fields are in many countries and the fresco of the ancient city of Sigiriya is only in Sri Lanka. Hikkaduwa was a pleasure and I had a nice time here but unfortunately it came to an end quickly. The next day I got on the train to get to another beautiful place after about an hour drive to Bentota.

Bentota

After a pleasant one hour train ride, I reached the town of Bentota. But I could not find any room here because they were all too expensive. Everyone wanted to raid 1500 rupees a night and without any more ideas I made an exception to the rule and allowed myself to take an rickshaw. Of course, he knew the area well and he arranged for a room where I paid 1510 rupees for two nights. It was more expensive than anywhere else but I had to get over it. Bentota is another tourist resort on the ocean and as I have noted, it is definitely expensive. There are a lot of expensive hotels prepared for tourists with thick wallets than for independent backpackers. I also noticed that there are a lot of tourists from Germany and England and many places have German inscriptions. As soon as I threw my backpack in the dirty room first I went over the ocean. Here was different than before because the beach was very wide and the entrance to the water was very shallow for a long time. I got here by going through a luxurious hotel with a beautiful pool surrounded by rocks and a large palm-lined garden. There were older men with big belly and stuffed pockets, and I, one thin, and rather poor, benefited from the hospitality of this hotel for free. For the next two days, the luxury I enjoyed so much was that I spent most of the day here. I was fit for the environment because I was white and no one asked me about the documents. I walked in and out when I wanted to.Then I began to understand why Bentota is the most expensive. When I was on the beach I sat under palm trees with young men who immediately contacted me to do business. In addition to standard questions, they tried to sell me marijuana and a pretty girl for 5000 rupees. They said my life in Sri Lanka is paradise, but for them there is nothing interesting. They do not have a job and therefore spend the whole day on the beach trying to sell grass or girlfriend and the government palm near “rich hotel” is the best. I also had a proposal to buy a coconut for 100 rupees and a papaya for 150 rupees although in town for both I would pay maybe 40. That day until dusk I spent in a beautiful hotel where I was swimming, sitting under palm trees and watching the ocean. At the end of my trip and especially in the lanes of transport I earned a little luxury – the more that it was free. After I broke through the sellers literally all the rickshaw drivers went to dinner at a cheap local pub. It was nice and the traditional dishes were tasty but the best part was my conversation with the waiter. At first he served me like a king and then sat down to me and wanted my contact and invited me home. Of course he wanted to sell me a girl and whatever I wanted, but finally admitted that he was badly here and wanted to emigrate to Oman. Whenever I’m not in this country, everybody wants to get out of here. With Bentota I made a couple of trips which in my opinion were much more interesting than Bentota itself.

Aluthgama

Alutghama is only 1km away from Bentota so I got here over the bridge after about 15min. Alutghama does not have anything special in her, and it is worth seeing in her. It is a small, dirty town with chaotic traffic, bazaars and everything that always has a small lanka town of this type. I came here to do banking, because in Bentota it is not possible and I did shopping. I was tempted to mango after 5 and 10 rupees from art and some papaya. There was also a fish stall where I could have a laugh with locals and see some interesting fish species. There was a flying fish that had fins turned into wings, 80kg tuna and many other interesting species of different shapes and colors. Aluthgama decides to reflect on the realism of this country, what can not be said about Bentota and that is why it is so attractive here. I found here a nice eatery where served rice with additives, roti with vegetables and coconut shreds and for fruit ice cream. Do it all at local prices.

Kosgoda

Kosgoda was by far one of the most enjoyable experiences in Sri Lanka. There are hatcheries of sea turtles that are open to tourists for a fee of course. At first, it was a non-profit organization but very quickly opened more hatcheries because the poor people felt in the air of the American dollar. I do not know if it has more to do with the earnings or conservation of species, but if a lot of turtles turn into turtles instead of scrambled eggs, it’s definitely something good. I went to the hatchery, which supposedly has the only albino turtle, and in the way I was escorted by a man who wanted to be nice but it is true that for bringing a tourist every one gets a commission. I met a fake guide with an artificial smile on his face, who sold tickets for 500 rupees but for the Americans and Swiss they were 1,000 rupees. In other hatcheries the entrance cost only 200 rupees and I paid so much. First I saw the nest of turtles strewn with sand on which was written how many eggs are in each of them. This works in such a way that fishermen dig out the turtles’ nests and sell them to the hatchery where they are buried. After hatching, the young are transferred to a seawater tank where they are fed until they reach a certain size, which guarantees them greater security. In addition, older turtles are less likely to suffer from certain diseases. Then I went to the pools where the little turtles were swimming and then to the larger places where the adults were already swimming. I could touch and even take my hand. When they were too big and heavy, I was helped by one boy and another while he was shooting and filming. In this hatchery and all others there were several species of sea turtles such as green turtle, carriage, olive or tortoise but no one had leathery. I was told that this species would require a much larger tank and a different temperature that they would not be able to provide. They had a young leopard turtle, but unfortunately not dead, in formalin. It was beautiful and the turtles made me happy and the people were very helpful.

There were also sad moments, and as always there was poverty. One man sang me a song about the tsunami and although I could not understand the words it was a sad song. During the tsunami, his father died. Another man had a child with epilepsy and did not heal because it was not like that. The head of the hatchery suggested that I come here with my family but wanted 3500 rupees for my room. When I told him straight about what I thought about the price he left for 1500 rupees but anyway the price was at least three times more expensive than normal. They were desperate for money because when I bought the postcard, the head of the hatchery rushed for 15 rupees. Anyway it was a very interesting place and I would recommend to anyone. On the way to Bentota I walked the beach and besides the beautiful open air, I saw fishermen spinning nets and laying their catch. They said they caught about 2,500 fish each day. I also saw a waran who quickly ran away and the children begging for money, sweets and pens. For the last money I returned to Aluthgama so I could pick the money and 5 minutes before the town the driver made a tea break.

My trip to Negombo

While still in Bentota I slept on the train so I had to get a rickshaw to Aluthgama where I boarded a small bus. At first it was even nice because I was going along the ocean but the atmosphere broke down when they ordered me to pay for my big backpack. In the suburbs of Colombo, my trip was eternal because it was a cork and then I saw the already known syf, or the districts of Fort and Pettah in Colombo. I bought new flip-flops for all 200 rupees because the old just fell off my feet and then got into the city train. I was going to Negombo or my last stop in front of the airport and I was glad because it was not far away. But I enjoyed too early because sitting on hard plastic seats I drove 40km in 2 hours. The train was in all the small holes that I did not even have on the map, but in the way people sang and the dealers were selling mangoes and pineapples. The cost was 20 rupees but my price has risen to 50, so once again I had to get upset and bought it for 20 rupees. So is still and slowly began to lose humor. Finally, after two hours, I reached Negombo, although it took me several minutes to get through the crowd.

Negombo

Negombo is my last destination in Sri Lanka. I deliberately chose this small fishing town as its last resort since it is conveniently located off Katunayake International Airport. Airport transportation is much shorter than that of Colombo and it is also much cheaper. Negombo is the first beach resort in Sri Lanka, and from what I’ve seen, it is not able to offer as many other charming towns in the south of the island. When I left the station I took an rickshaw and went to Lewis Place, which is the street where the entire tourist base is located. They wanted me to rent a room for 800 rupees per night but I managed to find out for 400. The first day I went to swim though it was raining and there was a strong wind. At first it was nice and the waves lifted me very high but I had to give up when the ocean started to put me on the rocks. That day it was already dark, so in the evening I only came down the main street to the last time to enjoy Latvian cuisine and art. Next morning I wanted to explore the area because Negombo has a great historical value. I tried to do it on a bike but here they wanted to take my life off without mercy because I did it on foot. It is worth mentioning that Negombo is strongly dominated by the Catholic Church and is home to the largest percentage of Catholics in Sri Lanka. There are also the largest number of Catholic churches and the highest percentage of Catholics. As I was walking into the city center, practically every moment I saw another church. One of the biggest churches is St. Sebastian though the Church of Sts. Maria looked older and had nice paintings. Negombo is sometimes referred to as the “little Rome”. On the way I also went through an interesting local bazaar where you could buy all the necessary stuff at a normal price. These included fruits, vegetables, home-made items made of coconut. It was also a good place to observe what Negombo is today. I bought a traditional Lanbian sweets, some mangoes and bananas, and a spoon made of coconut. I also sat in a nasty pub where I ate a disgusting meal in the company of harboring poor people.Then I went to see the Dutch fort or rather what was left of it. It was not a great and impressive fort as I had seen in Galle. To this day, only the gate with “1678” and the small clock tower have survived and the building inside the fort has been transformed into a prison.

There was also a demanding refurbishment of the cricket ground and the lake, which is today a harbor for fishing boats. Nearby there was an interesting fish market where for sale there were many interesting fish species though unfortunately I came on Sunday and there was no such choice as it is in the week. Too bad because, as one man said, they happen to be the real monsters that would be very interesting to me. From there I headed towards the center of Negombo and crossed, among other things, through the harbor where I tried to contact fishermen repairing the network. I also passed through the Dutch channels, which in this part of Sri Lanka are very extensive and their length reaches 120 km. In Negombo, there is a great deal of Dutch colonial influence, as well as the Dutch buildings and the Dutch fort, the Dutch have also developed their love of the canals. When I was in the center I sat in a few pubs to drink a coconut and then returned to Lewis Place where once again I walked across the street full of shops with art and souvenirs.On the same day at 12 o’clock in the evening I left the ordered rickshaw to the airport. After about 20 minutes of driving including a few military checks I arrived at the place. This is my beautiful trip to Sri Lanka.

Summary

As I suspected Sri Lanka was beautiful and worth every one spent here. I mean not only beaches, palms and turquoise ocean but also tea fields, antique cities and all the rest making up for the beauty of this country. There are also bad things like transport, raising prices for tourists or the civil war itself. Compared to neighboring India it is a little more expensive and unfortunately the Lankan government is pulling tourist prices to the maximum which can distaste tourists in this wonderful country. For me it was, above all, a beautiful, exotic island worth knowing. I spent a month here and it seemed to me that it would be enough but I could stay here much longer and I would know more and I would still be great. I have not been able to see the Sinharaja National Park or the Pinnewala Elephant Orphanage, and I would like to go back and see these two places again. I will wait until the civil war is over and maybe finally the ferry from India to Sri Lanka. It would be much more convenient and cheaper. Anyway it was beautiful.

When I came back from Sri Lanka, there was a breakthrough in this country in May 2009. The 26-year civil war against the rebels (Tamil Tigers) has finally come to an end. The much better equipped and larger Sri Lankan army was gaining more ground in the north of the island, until rebels whose specialties were bombing finally surrendered. Their leader was killed and a few Tigers put down their weapons. Refugee camps were formed for people from the north because the rebels used them as living shields in defense of their army. About 75,000 people died in that war. Now it is clear that Sri Lanka will be unified and not divided into two countries.

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